Facts about dog rehoming and adoption

Adopting a dog is often the best and the kindest thing you can do. Over 6.5 million companion animals enter U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year. Over half of these animals never find a home and are euthanized.

According to the animal shelter statistics, in 2017 around 1.5 million animals in shelters were euthanized. 670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats made up this staggering number, which amounted to almost 5,500 animals killed every day

What is Rehoming and how much does it?

Hundreds of thousands of pets are abandoned every year. When you can no longer care for a pet for any reason, rehoming can a good idea. Instead of abandoning your pet or sending them to an animal shelter where it may be killed, you can find him a new home for your pet. 

There are many reasons why a pet owner abandons a pet. More common ones include: Moving, can’t keep; landlord won’t allow; not enough time; and can’t afford.

You can prevent this by taking the time to find the right home for your dog. The process involves paying a certain rehoming fee. Don't worry, this is to help facilitate the rehoming process goes smoothly.

When rehoming a pet to someone you don’t know, it is common to charge a rehoming fee. On average, this can range from $25 to $100. A rehoming fee can help you cover charges for vaccinations, spaying, and neutering, and other expenses. 

You can help save these animals by finding them a comfortable home. Animal shelters around the country offer easy adoption and rehoming facility. It’s often cheaper to adopt a dog instead of buying a new dog. The cost for adoption usually accounts for a mere adoption fee, medical, ID tagging, vaccines, pet accessories

Why consider rehoming your dog?

Here are two major reasons for you to consider rehoming your dog.

To avoid dog squabbles at home

If you have two or more dogs at home, it's common to find them squabbling. When you introduce a new pet to your old, they can often become aggressive towards them. Frequent squabbles and rough play can put one or more dogs at risk of serious injury.

If the management of behavior isn't possible, it's fair to move your dog to a new home instead of abandoning them. Rehoming your dog will help it find another family.

The dog is a danger to someone in the household

Most dogs with behavioral issues are often abandoned by pet owners. To avoid dog bites or aggression towards other pets and humans, you can consider rehoming your pet. 

Change in circumstances

The circumstances in your life are unpredictable. You might land up a new job out of the state and must move or fly out of the country, or take up an apartment where the dogs aren't allowed. All of these circumstances may push you to make a rather harsh decision to abandon them. You can avoid this by rehoming your pet.

Wrong dog for the situation

Most new pet owners acquire a dog for a specific purpose such as assistance for the disabled, to assist people with medical conditions, for sporting activities or competition, etc. Once the purpose of dogs in your life is complete, you might decide to put it up for adoption or abandon it. The best possible thing you can do find a new home so the new owners can enjoy both the company and the skill of your pet.

Here are a few of the steps to find a new dog

It's rather simple to find and adopt a dog these days. Many animal shelters put up advertisement or listing in online directories for new pet owners to find a potential pet.

Step 1: Find a dog or puppy online

The organizations like ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in the UK) allow pet owners to find an adoptable dog of their choice.
They put up a list of dogs who are often abandoned or are put up for rehoming

Step 2: Complete a rehoming application form

The next step is to fill out an application form indicating that you're willing to adopt a new dog. After accepting your application, the organization or local animal shelter will arrange a visit.

Step 3: Get to know your new dog

When all the parties agree, you can visit the pet owners home or an animal shelter to meet the new dog. You can discuss all the details related to the dog, lifestyle, diet, medical condition, etc.

Step 4: Home visit

The officials from the animal shelter often visit your home to inspect the new facility. They'll also advise you on how to proceed further from here. 

Step 5: Bring home your new dog

Once everything is done, you can welcome the new dog home. Remember to introduce your new pet to your family member and any existing pets. If you must introduce your new dog to your old pet, be wary about the aggression and temperament of your old dog. Before you can get it home, you must spay or neuter it, vaccinate it, microchip it with an ID, and pay a rehoming or adoption fee.

How to introduce your dogs to dogs?

  • Solve your old dog's behavioral issues first
  • Decide on a meeting place
  • On-leash and off-leash meeting
  • Don't leave them alone
  • Break any fight or squabble
  • Separate their toys'
  • Dine them separately
  • Clearly establish your dominance
  • Train them separately

Things to keep in mind

  • Be wary of rehoming your pet through classified sites. Many people troll such sites looking for dogs to use for wrong purposes.
  • Charging a rehoming fee allows you the new adopter to demonstrate that they're serious about adopting your pet. Also, charging a rehoming fee will enable you to know that they've financial resources in hand.
  • Contact your local animal shelter, ASPCA, or adoptapet.com to successfully rehome your pet.

Here is a brief infographics about the facts about dog rehoming and adoption.

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the most reliable pet hospital in Urbandale. We also offer the best doggy daycare in Urbandale to help board, groom and train you canine. Leave them in the care of our certified veterinarian and daycare trainers. We also help rescue abandoned pets and find them a good home.

 

How to Become a Foster Parent to Pets?

Fostering is a usual concept in pet care where a person or a household takes in a homeless pet that needs parenting. Like fostering a human child, fostering a pet includes providing them utmost love, emotional support, hygienic meal, and time.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many pets are in need of constant care. Pets are in desperate need of foster care at this time partly because many shelter homes and volunteers had to close down temporarily to self-isolate. Pet abandonment is also rising mainly because people are forced to stay home with no work. With no money, pet owners are more likely to abandon.

Those with sheer interest and resources can definitely take up fostering. One can contact the local pet shelter to check if they can foster a pet. They will often set you up with the basic necessities, pet care advice and a supply of pet food to get started.

Why do People need to foster Pets?

There are many reasons a pet might need foster care. Some of the most common include:

  • A rescue group doesn’t have a physical shelter and depends on foster homes to care for pets until suitable homes are found.
  • A pup is too young to be adopted and needs a safe place to stay until it is old enough for adoption
  • A pet is recovering from surgery, illness, or injury and needs a safe place to recuperate.
  • A pet is showing signs of stress such as pacing or hiding in the shelter.
  • A pet has not lived in a home before or has not had much contact with people and needs to be socialized.
  • In many cases, fostering pets can help save space in the shelter which is running out of room for adoptable pets.
  • It helps shelter or rescues another pet.

How Do I Become A Foster Care Provider?

Deciding to become a foster parent to homeless pets can be the greatest treasures. So you’ve decided to become a pet foster parent, but what next?

Here is the brief outline to fostering a pet:

  • Check with local shelter homes or petfinder.com to find shelters and rescue groups near you.
  • Contact the organization in-person and fill up the foster application.
  • Evaluate and complete applications carefully
  • Get ready to bring home your foster pet
  • Share special moments with your pet and give the utmost care and attention
  • Socializing and training are parts of fostering a new pet.

Although it can be harder for the foster parents to send off their beloved pet once it is ready to be adopted, the bittersweet experience can be overcome by the feeling that you have more pets to take in and care for.

The first and foremost step is to contact your local shelter and rescue home. Websites like www.petfinder.com help to locate an animal shelter or rescue group near you along with filtering your search request to a specific breed, age, and type of animals. You can also find many other different adoption organizations that help seniors, special needs, or different animal types.

After successfully locating an organization, you can inquire or put in your request to foster a pet. Each application is carefully reviewed. You must ask this question:

  • Who pays for the vet bills?
  • Who is financially responsible for the dog’s food, microchip, leashes, crate, etc.?
  • Where will the dog be introduced to prospective adopters and what are your responsibilities?
  • Are you responsible for training the dog and if so, to what level?

The size of your home and time spent with a pet also determines if you can qualify to become a foster parent. For certain dogs, a foster parent who is home all day may be required, or home without cats or children.

The shelter or rescue group may require a veterinary reference and/or a printed application and one or more telephone or in-person interviews.

Frequently Asked Questions about Fostering

Here are some of the crucial questions you must consider before taking up fostering.

a. Are you able to separate the foster pets from your own?

You should have a place where you can isolate your foster pet from your own companion animals. It is important to introduce them slowly.

b. Are you prepared to pet-proof your home?

Preparing your home and the area the animal will stay in can prevent most accidents, help keep your pet safe and help set you both up for fostering success.

c. Are you willing to help a pet with medical concerns or who may need medication?

Ask if your foster pet has any medical considerations to be aware of any medication it needs to take. If so, make sure that you’re willing and able to make sure your pet is getting the medication or care.

d. Can you get to the shelter’s vet quickly in case of an emergency?

Talk to the shelter or rescue group about how they prefer you to handle any emergencies. The shelter or rescue group likely works with a veterinarian who can treat your foster pet. If the animal you are fostering needs medical attention, you will need to transport them to the veterinarian’s office or shelter for care.

e. What will you do to prepare to return the pet after the foster period is up?

Sometimes it can be difficult to let go once you have become emotionally attached to an animal! Although an emotional moment, when the day comes that you must bring your first foster pet back to the shelter or to an adoptive home you should be willing to do it.

f. Do you feel comfortable explaining to friends that these pets are not yours to adopt out and that they must go through the regular adoption process at the shelter?

If you are interested in helping to find a home for your foster pet, refer your friends and family to the shelter or rescue group to complete an adoption application.

Qualifications

To be a successful foster parent, you will need a compassionate nature, the cooperation of your family or partner, flexibility, and some knowledge of animal behavior. The length of time a foster pet may stay in your home varies with the animal’s situation.

Know Your Limits

Foster parents should know their limits while taking in a new foster pet.

  • Does your homeowner's insurance or city have any breed or weight restrictions? Do you have time to devote to a foster pet while giving your own pets the attention and care they need?
  • What kind of behavior problems are you comfortable dealing with – counter surfing, pulling on the leash, jumping when greeting, inappropriate elimination, separation anxiety, barking, reactivity? Don’t accept a foster that may need help beyond your experience and knowledge, unless you are willing to consult with a qualified trainer.
  • What kind of health considerations might you be willing to accommodate? Providing medication? Incontinence? Digestive disorders? Special dietary needs?
  • Do you require a foster dog that is comfortable around small children or other animals?

 

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines, to find more useful tips and ideas on fostering and adopting a pet.

National Puppy Day

March 23 is celebrated as the National Puppy Day through the U.S. Puppies are probably the most adorable animals on Earth. Thanks to their undying charm, innocent eyes, and timid limbs, they manage to capture our affection.

National Puppy Day is all about raising adoption awareness. Tons of homeless puppies land in the shelter every year. They are basically stuck in the rescue center throughout their life until they are adopted or euthanized.

National Puppy Day was founded in 2006 by Celebrity Pet & Home Lifestyle Expert and Author, Colleen Paige, who is also the founder of National Dog Day and National Cat Day (among many others).

The benefits of adopting a Puppy

a. Cheaper to Adopt

It's cheaper to adopt a pet than to buy one. Almost 6.5 million pets enter animal shelters every year. Each year 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized, simply because there isn’t enough space for new pets that land up in the shelter.

It costs lesser to adopt a pet than buying a new one from the pet-farm or Puppy mills. Adopt a pet from your local shelter or rescue. There are more than just dogs and cats that need homes, pets such as rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, birds, and farm animals need homes too.

b. Prevent Puppy Mill

It helps to prevent puppy mills from producing pets meant for commercial selling. Pet farms are the breeding center of pets that put profit above the welfare of dogs. The pets in farms are generally poorly housed and ill-fed. Most animals from puppy mill land up in the shelter when they aren’t brought by anyone.

c. Awareness about Animal Rights

Adopting a pet raises the concern for shelter animals. People who aren’t aware of shelter animal will learn about them. Those who are unaware about the ill-treatment of animals will learn about the issues faced by innocent animals. This helps to place a new law or legislation for animal rights.

d. Happy Time

You get to spend lots of time playing and cuddling with a puppy. The recent scientific study revealed that spending time with your favorite pet helps to reduce stress and depression. Most old-age homes have started adopting pets to spend time with their elder members.

How to Celebrate National Puppy Day?

  • Adopt a puppy from your local shelter, rescue or pure breed rescue organization.
  • Are you prepared for puppy parenting? Start off on the right paw! Hire a professional that can help you.
  • Donate money, food, and toys to your local shelter.
  • Organize a peaceful demonstration in front of your community pet store that sells puppies.
  • Write your Congressman and ask that he/she support the ban of Puppy Mills in your state.
  • Assist an ill or elderly neighbor by walking their puppy.
  • Have a puppy party and invite all your friends and their puppies!
  • Join a fun, dog-friendly community online and post pics of your puppy for the world to ooh and ahh over!
  • Host a community event to raise money for your local animal shelter.
  • Volunteer at your local shelter and offer to walk a puppy or play with a puppy, clean cages or anything else they need help with.
  • Have a portrait painted of your puppy to suspend the fleeting magic of puppydom.
  • Buy your puppy a fun, new puppy toy.
  • Give your puppy some fun exercise by taking him or her to puppy daycare.
  • Brush your puppy to eliminate excess fur.
  • Give your puppy a massage or holistic spa treatment.
  • Get your puppy some leash training lessons.
  • Buy your puppy a cute new outfit or fashionable collar and leash.
  • Have a tee shirt made with your puppy's photo on it.
  • Take your puppy to the beach.

Change a Pet’s Life Day is almost here!

It’s almost time to celebrate Change a Pet’s Life Day. Celebrated on January 24, the special day is held every year to encourage people to adopt pets from shelters and raise animal awareness.

On this day, pet shelters reduce the cost of adopting a new pet. Although the day highlights the importance of pet adoption to save shelter-pets from being deprived of homes, there are other ways you can support the cause.

Adopt a Pet

About 6.5 million pets enter animal shelters nationwide every year. Each year, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized (670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats), simply because the pet shelters lack enough room for new pets and lesser pets are ever adopted.

It actually costs lesser to adopt a pet than buying a new one from the pet-farm or Puppy mills. Pet farms are the breeding center of pets that put profit above the welfare of dogs. The pets in farms are generally poorly housed.

Adopt a pet from your local shelter or rescue. There are more than just dogs and cats that need homes, pets such as bunnies, guinea pigs, hamsters, birds, and farm animals need forever homes too.

Sponsor a Pet

If you can’t take a dog for yourself, you can get one for others. Consider gifting a shelter pet to your friend, family or someone considering to adopt a pet this year. Most adoptable shelter-pets costs ZERO to $250, hence, gifting one won’t be hard on your pocket.
Volunteer your time

You can also consider volunteering your time at the animal shelters. A helping hand is always appreciated. You can clean the shelter home, utilities, and beds, or play with the pets to keep them indulged and active. Volunteering your time will help shelters provide care for all the dogs that they look after, and it helps dogs get some much-needed socialization.

Donate

Animal shelters can't run by themselves. They need funds to carry out daily activities of feeding, caring, and nurturing the pets, initiating rescue missions, finding and protecting dogs, neutering or spaying, micro-chipping, and vaccination. Consider donating to animal shelters so they can give back to society.

Spread the word about Adoptable Dogs

You can always spread the word about the shelter homes in your area or any pet that needs to be adopted. Those who have less or none information about adoption will be encouraged to adopt a new pet.

Raise Awareness for Shelters

You can always put a word to your mayor, congressmen, or advocates to raise awareness for the animal shelters. Even better, you can seek if your local shelter is organizing any event. You can always offer a helping hand.

Tell Your Dog's story

To encourage others to adopt new pets, you can share your own story of owning a pet. When did you first meet your pet? How were the initial challenges? Unforgettable story or experience you share with your pet etc. Showing the positive impact your dog has had on your life is a great way to show others that a dog might be right for them, too.

One simple act of kindness can make a difference in a pet’s life.