7 Reasons why your old dog smells bad?

Dogs do often smell. It is a part of their hygiene. Many dogs smell when they have stepped outside for play or have foraged for food inside the dust-bin, however, there is always a difference between funny smell and stink.

Although common in many dogs, stinking isn’t noticeable until they have been diagnosed with different physical ailments. Stink is one of the earliest signs of underlying pet healthcare problems. Bad smell is more common in geriatric dogs who often encounter age-related diseases and ailments such as bowel disorder, cancer, oral disease, and anal sac problem.

It is essential that you keep track of how your dog smells over the time to ascertain there are any underlying physical problems with them. Once you begin noticing unusual smell or stink, you should immediately consult your veterinarian.

7 reasons why your old dog smells bad

Here are seven major reasons for an old dog to start smelling bad.

a. Dental Disease

Dental problem is common in many elder dogs. You should take elderly dogs to the vet every six months, so any underlying problems can be figured out before it gets serious. Depending on the dental problem, your dog might require tooth extraction, gum surgery, or a thorough cleaning.

By the age of 3, 70% of cats and 80% of dogs have some form of gum disease. Periodontal disease is common in dogs from a young age. It becomes more prevalent in elderly dogs. Periodontal disease begins when bacteria in the mouth combine with food particles to form plaque. Within days, minerals in the saliva bond with the plaque to form tartar resulting in a deteriorating gum line. It produces toxins that lead to bone and tissue damage.

While a slight odor is normal for pets, stinky breath indicates deteriorating oral hygiene. Sometimes the underlying dental infection or cancer can cause smelly breath.

Another problem specific in dogs is Gingival Hyperplasia, the overgrowth of the gums that can harbor food residue and produce a rotten smell. Boxers, Bulldogs, Cocker Spaniels, Collies, and Great Danes are more prone to this oral disease.

b. Incontinence

Urinary incontinence, also known as lack of bladder control, is more frequent in elderly dogs. The aging dogs are more prone to weaker bladder and bladder infection. Over time, the muscles of the urinary tract system start to weaken in elderly dogs. Without bladder control, urine leaks onto a pet’s fur, which leads to odor over time, unless given frequent baths.

The condition has been seen occurring more frequently in senior spayed females than male dogs. Certain breeds are predisposed to urinary incontinence, including the springer and cocker spaniel, Old English sheepdog, and Doberman pinscher.

If you begin noticing foul smells in your dog, you should certainly take them to the vet. Once diagnosed, your vet will prescribe medication to strengthen your dog's sphincter muscle for better urine control or offer hormonal therapy. Sometimes it could be the sign of kidney disease.

c. Kidney disease

Bad breath (Halitosis) isn’t always caused by poor oral hygiene, sometimes it could be deteriorating kidney problems. Pets with kidney disease are unable to eliminate toxins from the bloodstream, which build up over time and create an ammonia-like odor to your dog’s breath. A metallic odor to their breath could also be a sign of kidney disease.

Kidney disease is a frequent occurrence in elderly pets. Dogs diagnosed with kidney diseases are often thirsty. Excess water consumption and increased urination, dull coat, appetite loss, and mouth soreness are few of the symptoms of underlying kidney disease. When you notice the earliest signs of kidney diseases, you can consult your vet who will prescribe a special kidney diet. For chronic kidney diseases, a kidney transplant is a more common solution.

d. Diabetes

Elderly dogs are more prone to diabetes. Diabetes mellitus or Diabetes in general is a common disease in middle-aged and older dogs. It’s a complex disorder of carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism in dogs. It can be the result of a relative or absolute insulin deficiency or of peripheral cell insensitivity to insulin which is characterized by high blood glucose concentrations such that the renal threshold is exceeded.

Elderly dogs are unable to produce enough insulin or aren’t using insulin properly. The body fails to use the food they eat for nutrients. Over time the body will begin to weaken. It is an endocrine disorder. One of the effects of diabetes is a condition called ketosis when the body is forced to burn its fat supplies. When your dog is creating ketones, their breath will have a distinctive odor, which some say smell like nail polish remover, while others say the odor is sweet.

e. Skin Infection

There are many reasons for skin infection in dogs. Secondary bacterial infections from constant scratching, dogs with wrinkly skin, and allergies are often the major reasons for skin infection. Incessant scratching can lead to a bacterial infection which can give off a putrid odor.

Dogs with wrinkly skin, such as English bulldogs, Shar Pei's, or pugs, are more prone to developing skin fold dermatitis when two skins come close in contact. It creates a warm, moist environment perfect for an overgrowth of surface microbes which can produce toxins that cause irritation and inflammation.

Allergy is one of the major reasons for skin infection in dogs. It often manifests in itchy skin allowing bacteria to enter through breaks in the skin, leading to a stinky infection.

f. Anal Sac Issues

Anal sacs issue occurs because of anal sac infection or impactions. This often leads to a nasty smell. Anal sacs are two small glands located on either side of the dog’s rectum. If untreated, it can lead to anal sac rupture and forms an abscess which can also create quite a stench. Common signs of anal sac issues are when they drag their bottom on the ground, scooting, and licking of anal.

g. Flatulence

Flatulence occurs when your dog eats something it isn’t supposed to. On occasion, your dog’s diet may simply not agree with their gastrointestinal system, and a food change is in order.

 

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines, to find more useful tips and ideas taking proper care of elderly dogs.

How to Become a Foster Parent to Pets?

Fostering is a usual concept in pet care where a person or a household takes in a homeless pet that needs parenting. Like fostering a human child, fostering a pet includes providing them utmost love, emotional support, hygienic meal, and time.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many pets are in need of constant care. Pets are in desperate need of foster care at this time partly because many shelter homes and volunteers had to close down temporarily to self-isolate. Pet abandonment is also rising mainly because people are forced to stay home with no work. With no money, pet owners are more likely to abandon.

Those with sheer interest and resources can definitely take up fostering. One can contact the local pet shelter to check if they can foster a pet. They will often set you up with the basic necessities, pet care advice and a supply of pet food to get started.

Why do People need to foster Pets?

There are many reasons a pet might need foster care. Some of the most common include:

  • A rescue group doesn’t have a physical shelter and depends on foster homes to care for pets until suitable homes are found.
  • A pup is too young to be adopted and needs a safe place to stay until it is old enough for adoption
  • A pet is recovering from surgery, illness, or injury and needs a safe place to recuperate.
  • A pet is showing signs of stress such as pacing or hiding in the shelter.
  • A pet has not lived in a home before or has not had much contact with people and needs to be socialized.
  • In many cases, fostering pets can help save space in the shelter which is running out of room for adoptable pets.
  • It helps shelter or rescues another pet.

How Do I Become A Foster Care Provider?

Deciding to become a foster parent to homeless pets can be the greatest treasures. So you’ve decided to become a pet foster parent, but what next?

Here is the brief outline to fostering a pet:

  • Check with local shelter homes or petfinder.com to find shelters and rescue groups near you.
  • Contact the organization in-person and fill up the foster application.
  • Evaluate and complete applications carefully
  • Get ready to bring home your foster pet
  • Share special moments with your pet and give the utmost care and attention
  • Socializing and training are parts of fostering a new pet.

Although it can be harder for the foster parents to send off their beloved pet once it is ready to be adopted, the bittersweet experience can be overcome by the feeling that you have more pets to take in and care for.

The first and foremost step is to contact your local shelter and rescue home. Websites like www.petfinder.com help to locate an animal shelter or rescue group near you along with filtering your search request to a specific breed, age, and type of animals. You can also find many other different adoption organizations that help seniors, special needs, or different animal types.

After successfully locating an organization, you can inquire or put in your request to foster a pet. Each application is carefully reviewed. You must ask this question:

  • Who pays for the vet bills?
  • Who is financially responsible for the dog’s food, microchip, leashes, crate, etc.?
  • Where will the dog be introduced to prospective adopters and what are your responsibilities?
  • Are you responsible for training the dog and if so, to what level?

The size of your home and time spent with a pet also determines if you can qualify to become a foster parent. For certain dogs, a foster parent who is home all day may be required, or home without cats or children.

The shelter or rescue group may require a veterinary reference and/or a printed application and one or more telephone or in-person interviews.

Frequently Asked Questions about Fostering

Here are some of the crucial questions you must consider before taking up fostering.

a. Are you able to separate the foster pets from your own?

You should have a place where you can isolate your foster pet from your own companion animals. It is important to introduce them slowly.

b. Are you prepared to pet-proof your home?

Preparing your home and the area the animal will stay in can prevent most accidents, help keep your pet safe and help set you both up for fostering success.

c. Are you willing to help a pet with medical concerns or who may need medication?

Ask if your foster pet has any medical considerations to be aware of any medication it needs to take. If so, make sure that you’re willing and able to make sure your pet is getting the medication or care.

d. Can you get to the shelter’s vet quickly in case of an emergency?

Talk to the shelter or rescue group about how they prefer you to handle any emergencies. The shelter or rescue group likely works with a veterinarian who can treat your foster pet. If the animal you are fostering needs medical attention, you will need to transport them to the veterinarian’s office or shelter for care.

e. What will you do to prepare to return the pet after the foster period is up?

Sometimes it can be difficult to let go once you have become emotionally attached to an animal! Although an emotional moment, when the day comes that you must bring your first foster pet back to the shelter or to an adoptive home you should be willing to do it.

f. Do you feel comfortable explaining to friends that these pets are not yours to adopt out and that they must go through the regular adoption process at the shelter?

If you are interested in helping to find a home for your foster pet, refer your friends and family to the shelter or rescue group to complete an adoption application.

Qualifications

To be a successful foster parent, you will need a compassionate nature, the cooperation of your family or partner, flexibility, and some knowledge of animal behavior. The length of time a foster pet may stay in your home varies with the animal’s situation.

Know Your Limits

Foster parents should know their limits while taking in a new foster pet.

  • Does your homeowner's insurance or city have any breed or weight restrictions? Do you have time to devote to a foster pet while giving your own pets the attention and care they need?
  • What kind of behavior problems are you comfortable dealing with – counter surfing, pulling on the leash, jumping when greeting, inappropriate elimination, separation anxiety, barking, reactivity? Don’t accept a foster that may need help beyond your experience and knowledge, unless you are willing to consult with a qualified trainer.
  • What kind of health considerations might you be willing to accommodate? Providing medication? Incontinence? Digestive disorders? Special dietary needs?
  • Do you require a foster dog that is comfortable around small children or other animals?

 

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines, to find more useful tips and ideas on fostering and adopting a pet.

How has the Global Lockdown Affected the Wildlife?

With humans safely enclosed inside homes, urban wildlife and vegetation are taking over the streets. Vegetation slowly reclaims large cities, while deer foxes and other small animals roam the streets.

The closest we’ll ever get to this scenario will be in an actual apocalypse. Although New York City isn’t exactly roamed by Zombies like in ‘I am Legend,’ one can feel the same eeriness when walking down the street.

In San Francisco, coyotes—normally scared away by cars— are traipsing across the desolate Golden Gate Bridge. In the Welsh town of Llandudno, mountain goats are moving in. In Barcelona, wild boar have infiltrated the city center. Jackals were seen roaming around Hayarkon Park in Tel Aviv, Israel.

Jackals in Tel Aviv

Although urban wildlife is thriving at this time of lockdown, the animals which depend on the specific environmental condition are likely suffering. Specialist wildlife requires specific foods or environmental conditions, and the specialists are the species that are generally of conservation concern.

Lockdown has affected the Wildlife

With lockdown in effect, it has adversely affected the ecotourism industry-funded conservation efforts. In Namibia, tourism accounts for 16 percent of employment. In Tanzania, protected lands cover over a quarter of the country’s total area. But in the last few weeks, these tourism industries have declined.

The slump in tourism is likely to stay in place until September at least, according to the Nature Conservancy. Without tourists, they are less likely to pay salaries for the security guards who protect animals from poachers.

Many experts fear that facing massive unemployment, people in the tourism industry may themselves turn to poach to feed their families.

Matt Brown, Africa regional managing director for the Nature Conservancy said,

Anything with a horn right now, like rhinos, is at risk of being poached. The concern is that we're going to lose the last 10 years of good conservation work—and an increase in animal numbers—quickly because of this.

Mountain goats in Wales

Animals in Captivity are suffering

Animals that are kept in human captivity for entertainment or other commercial purposes are suffering from the lockdown. Although keeping animals in human captivity is outright wrong, many animals who already are living in captivity are suffering from a lack of human attention.

Amusement parks which employ animals such as dolphins, penguins, and seals are mostly suffering from lack of tourist. Without tourists, the parks aren’t able to feed the animal. Many experts are of the opinion that the owners of amusement parks or other forms of human captivity must release the animals to their natural habitat.

Natasha Daly, a writer for National Geographic, says the decline in tourism is a global issue that will continue to affect the animal industry in uneven ways. And smaller facilities will face a heavier burden than larger, more established ones.

She fears that it’s a very real concern that many of these animals that are languishing in some of these substandard facilities around the world may not be getting the care or food or veterinary attention that they would if the facilities had the sort of money coming in that they’re used to.

Some desperate animals have been recorded wandering into city centers in search of food. This can do harm to both them and the local resources.

How COVID-19 Pandemic has prevented the consumption of Exotic Animals?

As we all know, the first case of COVID-19 transmission began in the wet market of Wuhan Province in China. Experts are of the opinion that the zoological virus transmitted from a Pangolin to the animal, while others are of the opinion that the virus first transmitted after eating a bat’s meat.

According to NewsWeek.com,

In Shenzhen, China, a law was passed banning the sale and consumption of dog and cat meat, which will come into effect on May 1. Known as the "Shenzhen Special Economic Region Regulation on a Comprehensive Ban on the Consumption of Wild Animals," the legislation was passed in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. It also bans the consumption, breeding, and sale of wildlife for human consumption in the city—including snakes, lizards, and other wild animals.

Another animal that enjoys the recent ban in the pandemic is the pangolin—a mammal that has protective scales on its body made of keratin, which is the same material as human nails.

Pangolin is a mammal wholly-covered in scales. The animal found in the wild or sanctuaries depends on the diet of ants, termites, and larvae.

Unfortunately, the pangolin is one of the most trafficked animals in the world. Many smugglers traffic pangolins from Asia and African nations to the popular black market of China and Vietnam. Their meat is considered a delicacy and is used in traditional medicine.

Although the animal is regarded as an endangered species and is protected under national and international laws, animal meat is flourishing in the black market.

However, COVID-19 has forced the Chinese government to put a temporary ban on trading and eating many wild animals, including pangolins.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) says that two of the African species of the pangolin are considered vulnerable and two are endangered. It also shows that of the Asian species, one is endangered and the other three are critically endangered.

With the prolonging lockdown, many people are expected to lose jobs. This may include jobs held by experts and caretakers who look after wildlife species inside the conservation area, sanctuaries, animal parks, etc. With dwindling manpower and lack of resources, the upkeep of the animal may see a large problem.

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines. To ensure you and your pets’ safety during this pandemic, we can provide useful tips and resources online.

How Can You and Your Pet Beat the Self-Quarantine Stress?

Each one of us is contemplating when the COVID-19 pandemic will be over. Staying in a self-quarantine state can be one of the most boring and stressful things. One of the burning issues of staying put at home every day is the claustrophobia.

Like us humans, pets feel claustrophobic too! Being confined in a single space for a long time can equally increase stress in animals. Most pets such as dogs resort to incessant panting, pacing, and whining when suffering from claustrophobia.

An estimated 68% of U.S. households have a pet. During the time of self-quarantine, you have an opportunity to beat stress and claustrophobia by indulging in playful activities with your pets.

How Dogs can cope with Self-quarantine stress?

Canine have been domesticated for over 10,000 years. They are bred in such a way that they require enough attention, time, and dedication. When left away for a long time, they can develop signs of frustration.

Claustrophobia in dogs is the fear of restriction and can vary in intensity from one dog to another. Whether a dog will develop this fear is influenced by their genetics, conditioning, as well as the amygdala in their brain. The amygdala plays a major role because it’s responsible for fear conditioning, as well as the flight or fight response.

Dogs aren’t used to sitting in a confinement for a long time. They want their owners to play with them or provide attention which isn’t possible when they are working from home.

Remus a blue heeler/collie mix owned by Jerin Henderson situated in Portland, Texas has started withdrawing from its regular life. As Jerin is spending more time working, he's not able to spend more time playing with Remus.

Remus started whining a lot lately. It started sleeping underneath the bed for a few days. It came as a surprise because Remus always slept with him on the same bed.

How to prevent self-quarantine stress in dogs?

  • Take them to an open area to calm down but do not let them off the lead as they are likely to run.
  • Talk calmly in a low voice to settle them and avoid large reactions.
  • When at home, avoid using doors to contain the dog. Instead, opt for gates that they can see out of, making them less likely to trigger.

Cats are looking for Me-Time

In the case of cats, it’s mostly the opposite. Cats are a more solitary animal and they enjoy their me-time.

A house cat Karban owned by Hirow Peralta situated in Charleston, South Carolina started showing awkward behavior. Karban was used to having the whole house to itself when Hirow went out to work. It enjoyed sitting inside the house, but since Hirow started spending her entire time home, Karban started becoming restless.

Hirow wrote in Twitter

“she so tired of me being home she became an outside cat."

Karban who never left home started escaping the confinement and spend more time on the roof.

How to provide me-time for Cats?

  • Increase the physical distance between you and your cat. This can include working in a different room or space in a house.
  • If you share the same space such as a studio apartment, give your cats something to play with or keep it occupied.

How Pet Owners can cope with Self-quarantine Stress?

The self-quarantine time has been equally difficult for pet owners. Most of us struggle with working from home while trying to balance time with pets. It’s likely for people to experience claustrophobia when we have to spend the entire day inside the home.

At such dire time, spending more time with pets has been linked with beating self-quarantine stress for both pets and pet owners.

An estimated 17.3 million adults suffer from major depression, according to the latest National Institute of Mental Health data.

Research also has shown that people who don’t feel connected to others are more likely to catch a cold, develop heart disease, have a lower cognitive function, and live shorter lives.

How owning a pet can help with beating stress and depression?

The companionship of pets such as cats and dogs in daily life can help prevent frustration and depression. It has always been attested by different scientific communities.

  • Interacting with animals on a regular basis helps to decrease levels of cortisol (a stress-related hormone) and lower blood pressure. Pet can be a great companion. They can help reduce loneliness, increase feelings of social support, and boost your mood.
  • Owning a physical active pet such as dogs and cats can reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, ease loneliness, and encourage exercise and playfulness. Playing with your pet can improve your cardiovascular health.
  • Playing with and caring for an animal can be more beneficial for children at the time of self-quarantine. It can help them grow up more secure and active.
  • Spending time with pets can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which will calm and relax you.
  • Companionship will prevent the onset of stress and depression. Caring for a live animal can help make you feel needed and wanted, and take the focus away from your problems, especially if you live alone. Most dog and cat owners talk to their pets, some even use them to work through their troubles.
  • Taking a dog for a walk, hike or run is a fun and rewarding way to stay fit and healthy. Studies have shown that dog owners are far more likely to meet their daily exercise requirements—and exercising every day is great for the animal as well. It will deepen the connection between you, eradicate most behavior problems in dogs, and keep your pet fit and healthy.

 

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines, to find more useful tips and ideas on beating self-quarantine stress. To ensure you and your pets’ safety during this pandemic, we can provide useful tips and resources online.

How to keep your pets occupied during the lockdown?

There is a lot of news coming out about pet owners struggling to stay home with their pets. Most pet owners are finding it hard to find new activities to keep their pets indulged throughout the day.

One thing pet owners can worry less about the pandemic is that there are no cases of COVID in pets. Scientists confirmed that pets such as dogs and cats are less likely to contract COVID-19. However, they are prone to different types of coronaviruses, but that has nothing to do with the current outbreak of COVID-19.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, no animals in the US have been identified with the virus, and there is no evidence that dogs or other pets can spread COVID-19.

How to keep your pets occupied during the Lockdown?

Here is a guide for the pet owners to help make things a little easier for their pets. We have broken down the guide according to the animal you own.

Dog

Here is how you can keep your dog occupied.

Search Games: No games are ever outdated for dogs. At this time of lockdown, you can create a game such as hiding treats or toys around the house for your dog to find. This will help to keep them on their feet and stimulate their brain.

Shell game: This is a popular mental stimulus. Place three plastic cups upside-down on the floor and hide a treat or toy under a cup. Move the cups around each other. Let your dog find the treat or toy by point out any of the cups.

Chewing: Chewing is the natural behavior of dogs. Give them chews such as Kongs to keep them busy for hours, as well as helping to maintain good dog dental hygiene.

Teach basic commands: This can be the best time to train your dog. You can begin with basic commands such as "sit", "stay", "come," “leave,” etc. If you need help delegating the commons, you can always refer to certified pet training channels on YouTube.

Teach names: Give toys names and ask your dog to fetch "teddy", "ball", or "dolly" and put them in a box.

Cat

Unlike dogs, cats have different ways to keep themselves occupied. However, if you wish to spend some quality and productive time with your cat, you can follow these guides.

Agility: Agility exercise can be very useful for cats. You can find many great videos on YouTube about Do-it-yourself agility exercises. You can find many timed obstacle courses online.

Fishing games: Turn some string into a kind of fishing rod. Fix a shuttlecock at the end of it and then swing it through the room. Your cat will love chasing it!

Clicker training: Training basic command to cats is very different from training basic commands to dogs. You can teach your cat a lot with clicker training like few tricks such as "come" and "high five."

Ball games: Cats love to chase or catch anything that moves. Throwing a bouncy ball against the wall will keep your cat busy for hours trying to catch it.

Torch game: Use a torch or laser-light to make a spot dart around the room and let your cat indulge her passion for ‘hunting’ it.

Small Animals

Small animals may include hamsters, mice, and rabbits. Here is how you can keep them occupied.

Obstacle courses: Build a small and safe obstacle course using a few small boxes made out of cardboard or paper of different heights with treats on top of them, so that your pet is kept busy finding the treats.

Hide-and-seek: This game works well if the incentive is to find food treats. Just spread a few healthy snacks around the room for your pet to find.

Hunt game: Tie a piece of apple or any other fruit and food that your pet fancies to a tight ribbon and pull it across the room to get your pet to ‘hunt’ the fruit.

Frequently Asked Questions

During the time of the pandemic, pet owners are worried about their pet’s health.  Here are some of the answers to frequently asked questions by the pet owners.

How can I keep my dog in a routine while I’m working from home?

With both pets and pet owners inside the house, it’s hard to find time to keep up with the usual schedule such as work, eat, or exercise. Pet’s need optimum physical and mental stimulation to keep them healthy.

Although you’re home trying to maintain the regular schedule. Ensuring your dog has as normal a routine as possible is really important. When they get used to the unusual schedule during the lockdown, it can be hard for them to cope with a regular schedule post-lockdown.

It will also help to get your dog into a routine if you try to start and finish work at the same time each day and take your break/lunch at the same sort of time. When you’re home, try to spend more with your pet indulging in the activities you missed. You can indulge in different types of games or training sessions.

Can I walk my dog outside?

US Government has outlined that healthy people who don’t have symptoms can go outside and exercise within 2km of their homes, once they practice social distancing.

If you have a backyard or empty spaces around your house, you can always take your pet outside. This can be true for the suburbs; however, if you live in a dense city, you must practice precautions before going out.

Keep your dog on-lead when out walking and don’t be afraid to ask people not to pet your dog to ensure you stay at least two meters apart from other people at all times.

You should avoid parks or open spaces where your dog might wander off. Keep your dog on the lead. Don’t forget to pick up after your dog and wash your hands thoroughly when you are back inside.

Can I walk my dog off the lead?

It can be a bad idea to walk your dog off lead mainly because they can wander off. When the strict rules are placed on movement, it is important that you adhere to traveling long distances.

If you use a long lead, we’d suggest slowly introducing a short lead – this can be done by slowly limiting their distance from you, using positive rewards to let them know they are doing a good job!

Your daily walk is a good time to spend quality time with your dog. Wherever possible, try to give them your undivided attention.

Get in touch with Urban Pet Supply & Resort, a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines, to find more useful tips and ideas on keeping your pets happy. To ensure you and your pet's safety during this pandemic, we can provide useful tips and resources online.

Benefits of being a Cat Owner

Owning a pet is the greatest pleasure in the world. According to a scientific study, owning a pet is linked to better mental health. Along with helping your mental stimulation, keeping a cat ensures a friendly environment at home.

DID YOU KNOW? Cat is the most popular pet in the United States. More people own cats than dogs. 86% of the household owns about 85 million cats according to the National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association (APPA).

Let’s take a look at the benefits of owning a pet, especially a cat.

Benefits of Being a Cat Owner

Here are ten of the most essential benefits of owning a cat.

1. Owning a feline is better for the environment

Cats are environment-friendly pets. They account for almost zero carbon emissions. If you're worried about the carbon footprint, it’s better to own a cat than a dog. The resources such as food, shelter, and clothes required for a cat is way much lesser than owning a dog. Resources needed to pet a dog over the course of its lifetime create the same eco-footprint as that of a Land Cruiser.

Cats have smaller appetite compared to dogs and are more likely to eat small choices of food. The pet healthcare cost associated with a cat is lesser than other pets as well.

2. Cope with your emotional stress

We all go down the bad phase of life where we might lose the loved one, get separated with a confidant, lose a lifetime opportunity, or feel in despair. Cats have been shown to help people get over their loss more quickly.

Owning a pet, in general, helps to cope with emotional difficulty. Despite being an animal, they can serve as social support. The best thing about pets is that they do not judge you like a human or leave you at your worst.

3. Help find a partner

A British survey found that 82% of women are more attracted to men who like animals such as dogs and cats.

Many women chose a cat over a dog. Whopping 90 percent of single women said that men with cats as pets are “nicer.” Even if you aren’t able to find a partner, you can always rely on the company of your pet.

4. Survey says, “Cat Owners are Smarter”

It’s isn’t true that owning a cat makes you outright smart, but when you are a dedicated person who delves into longer work and study hours, owning a cat can be the best thing for you.

A 2010 survey of British pet owners by the University of Bristol found that people who owned cats were more likely to have college degrees.

The time spent in caring for other pets like a dog can consume a lot of time. Tending a cat requires way less time compared to other pets, hence giving more time for the pet owner to focus on other important things.

5. A Healthy Heart

Owning a pet is linked to a healthy heart! Cats, in particular, can lower your stress level and lower the amount of anxiety in your life. A scientific study over a 10-year period concluded that the cat owners were 30 percent less likely to die of a heart attack or stroke than non-cat owners. Although it may require further scientific research, it is proven that owning a pet can lower your stress level. Time to adopt a new cat now!

6. Fulfill your need for Companionship

Each of us seeks companionship! What better to fulfill that by adopting a cat? Caressing a cat and receiving the same kind of affection back can fulfill your companionship needs.

An Austrian study conducted in 2003 found that having a cat in the house is the emotional equivalent of having a romantic partner.

Unlike dogs, cats are more likely to be demanding and stubborn. An interesting scientific study conluded that:

After thousands of years of domestication, cats have learned how to make a half purr/half howl noise that sounds remarkably like a human baby’s cry. And since our brains are programmed to respond to our children’s distress, it is almost impossible to ignore what a cat wants when it demands it like that.

7. They tell a lot about your personality

Your choice of pet reveals a lot about your personality. As per the study conducted, most dog owners are found to have a more extrovert life, while the cat owners are quieter and more introverted.

Cat owners score highly when it comes to being trustworthy, less manipulative, and modest.

8. Sleep Better

Sleeping with a pet around is linked with quality sleep and healthy pattern. A study in UK found women preferred to sleep with their cats than with their partners. It has to do with a sense of security, companionship, and safety.

A study conducted by Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine indicates that 41 percent of the people in that study told that they slept better because of their pet, while only 20 percent said that it led to disturbances.

9. Fewer Allergies

The National Institutes of Health released a study in 2002 that children under a year old who were exposed to a cat were less likely to develop allergies

High pet exposure early in life can protect against not only pet allergy but also other types of common allergies. Marshall Plaut, M.D., chief of the allergic mechanisms section at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases concludes this in his research.

Although there might be a chance of contracting cat-related diseases such as cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii, experts say that by changing your cat’s litter box every day and keeping them indoors, you will remain safe!

10. They can Save Your Life

Cats are infamous for their reputation of remaining aloof and not caring about their humans. But in certain cases, they were known to have saved lives.

A cat in the UK warns her human companion when he’s about to have an epileptic seizure. A cat in Montana woke up its two humans when a gas pipe started leaking. Firefighters told the couple that the house could easily have exploded if not for cat’s intervention.

Throughout history, cats have received the highest medals for their bravery and smartness.

How to keep your cats happy?

Here are five ways you can keep your cats happy.

  • Respect their space
  • Provide entertainment like playthings or toys
  • Feed them right. Feeding right means the right food at a right time.
  • Keep their teeth in check
  • Go outdoor with them

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is a premier pet hospital specializing in pet care services in Des Moines. Get in touch with us to know more about pet care, vaccination and therapies, and diet plans.

Can Dogs Get The COVID-19?

Although there are thousands of cases of COVID-19 infection among humans, there have been fewer or none cases in pets such as dogs and cats. Simply put, your pets are less likely to contract COVID-19, however, they are prone to different types of coronaviruses, but that has nothing to do with the current outbreak of COVID-19.

Coronavirus disease 2019 or popularly known as COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS coronavirus 2 or SARS-CoV-2).

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, no animals in the US have been identified with the virus, and there is no evidence that dogs or other pets can spread COVID-19.

How worried should a pet owner when the pet gets infected?

Dr. Andrew Pickerstein from Stamford, Connecticut clarified that,

“Dogs do not get this novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Although a couple of dogs in Asia did test positive on a surface swab, they weren’t actually infected with it.”

There aren’t any concrete cases of COVID-19 infection in pets; hence, until there is any information, the experts suggest that the pet owners can feel confident that the virus won’t spread between pets. However, there is a greater likelihood of certain bacteria on animals spreading between owners and their pets, so diligent hand washing is recommended.

What about the dog in Hong Kong?

The news of a Pomeranian contacting COVID-19 hit the news on February 28. This sent a caution to the pet owners around the world. Hong Kong health authorities announced that a dog belonging to a woman sick with COVID-19 also tested “weakly positive” for the new coronavirus, the virus that causes the disease.

Experts called it a “low-level infection” –suggesting it was surface contamination, with the dog picking up traces of the virus in its nose and mouth rather. Although this was likely to be the first reported case of human-to-animal transmission of the disease, the experts nullified any chances of serious illness in the dog.

What does that test result mean for the pet owners and family members?

Although pets are prone to other types of coronaviruses, pet owners can be relieved that their pets are safe from the novel coronavirus.

Previous experience with SARS suggests that cats and dogs will not become sick or transmit the virus to humans.

Experts from the University of Hong Kong, City University and the World Organization for Animal Health had been consulted, and all “unanimously agreed that these results suggest that the dog has a low level of infection and it is likely to be a case of human-to-animal transmission.”

Pet owners should practice caution whenever around an animal such as regularly washing hands before and after petting the dog, covering mouth with a tissue or a mask, and distancing oneself from the pet if there are any signs of infection.

How Pet owners keep their animals and family’s safe?

The preventive measures for COVID-19 are as follows:

a. Wash your hands frequently

To keep yourself and your pets from contracting COVID-19 or any other form of Coronavirus, you should thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Washing your hand prevents easy transmission of the infection.

b. Maintain Distance

If you have any symptoms such as coughing or sneezing, maintain at least 1 meter (3 feet) distance between yourself and your dog. Sneezing or coughing often sprays small liquid droplets that may contain the virus.

c. Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth

To ensure the safety of your family and pets, do not fidget with your eyes, nose, and mouth before or after petting your dog. Most infections occur when a person incessantly touches their nose, mouth, and eyes.

d. Practice respiratory hygiene

Make sure to cover your mouth or nose when sneezing or coughing. Use disposable tissue and mask whenever around your pets

e. Seek medical care early

Stay home or indoors if you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. It’s essential to quarantine yourself and keep your pets away from you.

f. Stay informed

Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow the advice given by your healthcare provider, your national and local public health authority or your employer on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

 

What about the reports that an animal was the source of the virus?

A research team investigating about COVID-19 outbreak said COVID-19 may originate in bats. The genome sequencing of the novel coronavirus is as high as 96 percent identical with a type of coronavirus from bats, the team said, adding that the new coronavirus enters the receptor using the same cells with SARS virus.

Many experts suggested that the COVID-19 originated in the Wuhan’s Seafood market in China. Analysis of genomic data from 93 samples of the novel coronavirus suggests it was imported from elsewhere and the Chinese seafood market boosted its circulation and spread.

What should I do if my animal came in contact with someone who is later diagnosed with COVID -19?

Animals spread viruses between one another that are genetically distinct from human viruses. The genetic distinction makes it extremely difficult for humans and their pets to pass diseases on to one another including COVID-19.

There isn’t evidence that COVID-19 can spread through pets, so don’t worry. If your pet gets sick after interaction with someone with COVID-19, first call your veterinarian.

What if I or someone in my family develops COVID-19 or I am placed in quarantine because of close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19? What should I do about caring for my pet?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend limiting contact with pets or other animals if you develop COVID-19. In such a case, you should appoint someone else in the household to care for your pet if you are sick.

If you are in quarantine, but not sick, technically, your pet is in quarantine also, and you should find some way to care for the animal in the confines of your home, says veterinarian McKenzie.

Animal Rescue Foundation in Walnut Creek and the East Bay SPCA recommend that

  • Take precautions similar to common flu prevention.
  • Seek out reliable sources for updated information. The Centers for Disease Control, www.cdc.gov; World Health Organization, www.who.int; and World Small Animal Veterinary Association, www.wsava.org, are good places to go for information on the virus.
  • If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, the CDC recommends you minimize contact with your animal companions. Identify a family member or friend who can care for your pet.
  • Have crates, food, and extra supplies, including medications, on hand for quick movement of the pet. Two weeks’ worth of food, medicine, and other supplies is recommended. A pet first-aid kit is also good to have for any unplanned situation.
  • Ensure your animal’s vaccines are up-to-date in case boarding becomes necessary.
  • Document all medications with dosages and administering directions, including prescriptions from your veterinarian if a refill becomes necessary.
  • Pets should have identification such as an ID tag on their collar and a microchip. But remember, a microchip is only as good as the contact information registered to it.
  • Follow CDC and WHO guidelines: Wash your hands with soap and water for the time it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice; avoid touching your face; stay home if you are sick; cough or sneeze into your elbow; wash your hands before and after handling pets.
  • Pets don’t need masks.
  • If your companion animal has been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19, contact the public health worker involved with the patient’s care. They will contact state veterinarians and direct you from there. If you are told to bring your pet to your veterinarian, call first so they can prepare isolation areas.

Choosing a doggy daycare

Doggy Daycare or pet daycare is the one-stop pet care center for canines. Like a nursery for small kids, doggy daycare is designed to cater to pets when the owners are away for work or travel.

Doggy daycare isn’t only a place to board your pets but a place for them to learn essential social skills, enjoy different games and explore different kinds of mental and physical stimulation.

Benefits of choosing a doggy daycare

  • Socialization
  • Exercise
  • Teaching Learning Center
  • Peace of mind for the owner
  • Safety
  • Relieves boredom and anxiety
  • Relieves loneliness
  • Lots of affection
  • Provides routine
  • Affordable

But daycare is not a one-size-fits-all solution, and daycares vary considerably in quality. You must choose the right daycare. But how do you know which daycare is right for your pet? Let’s take a look at how daycare differs from others.

Choosing a Doggy Daycare

How do you choose the best daycare for your pet? The list is endless. Although every doggy daycare may advertise as one of the premier institutions, you must be wary about what’s best for your pet.

Here are some of the criteria that you must seek to fulfill to find the best doggy daycare.

A. Tour the Facilities

The first thing you should do as a concerned pet owner is to look around the facility first-hand. Nothing else can give you’re a better impression of the facility than visiting the place. It's essential to ascertain if the environment your dog will be hanging out in is clean and properly sanitized. You'll also want to learn about the safety precautions the owner has put in place.

Dog Daycare safety features should include:

  1. Ventilation –Ventilation is important in any building. The weather outside can hugely impact the weather inside the building. Make sure fresh air is getting to the dogs, whether it's through open doors or the Air Conditioner.
  2. Proper fencing –Animals are a curious being and can escape the compound without the staff ever noticing. Check the facility for proper fencing that is strong enough to resist the weight of a dog and high enough to keep adventurous dogs from jumping over. Double gating provides a space for the dog to get acclimated to the play area before it joins the other dogs inside, which can improve safety.
  3. Safe floors –Rubber and epoxy floors provide better grip and friction than slick linoleum or cold concrete.

B. Separate units for large and small dogs

A doggy daycare should split the dogs into groups and keep a different unit for large and small dogs. Along with the size, temperament and play style of the dog should be taken into account while splitting the group.

Keeping all the dogs in a single room can be a bad idea as it may cramp the space and create hostility between the dominant and passive canines. Unlike outdoor parks, daycares are the confined space. Dogs should be separated according to their temperament to avoid any trouble.

C. Ask About the Staff-to-Dog Ratio

Some states have a set dog-to-human ratio for dog daycares, and others don't. Ask the dog daycare owner about possible state guidelines. The experts suggest a ratio of 15 dogs per human as a safe standard. The IBPSA also notes that allowances are often made for more active groups, where a ratio of one staffer per 10 dogs is desired, or less active groups, where 20 dogs per staffer are adequate.

D. Pick a Daycare with Guided Activities

The dog owners should ask about the activities the dogs will do throughout the day. The activities can range from training, grooming, socializing, physical and mental stimulation, games, etc. Daycare activities should focus on improving your dog’s behavior. The behavioral skills instilled in your dog will help carry it throughout its lifetime.

E. Check the Toy Policy

Some dogs can be very aggressive with other dogs, particularly when they are protecting a toy they think is theirs. If you know your dog isn't going to get along with another dog or dogs with toys, dog owners should bring the issue to the attention of the daycare managers—they will keep a careful eye on your pup.

F. Ask about the Daycare’s Treat Policy

Some dog daycares use treats to reward good behavior, and some don't. Ask the daycare manager about their use of treats and be sure to tell them if your dog displays aggressive behavior around food or if he’s on a special diet of any kind.

G. Does your daycare provide Boarding?

Sometime, you may need to board your dog overnight in the facility. Ask if the daycare has boarding options available because it's always going to be easier for a dog to acclimate to an environment if he's already been there playing.

H. Affordable

A doggy daycare doesn’t need to expensive to become one of the best daycares. Many dog owners avoid expensive daycare because of the limited pet budget. When you assess a daycare, always ascertain the services and their prices. Depending on your area and how often your dog will attend, the cost of daycare can add up quickly. (Typical rates are around $15 to $30 per day.)

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the best doggy daycare in Des Moines. One of the premier doggy daycare in Des Moines we specialize in both daycare and boarding facilities.

We offer a home away from home experience. Our luxury suites available with TV/DVD and/or webcams, along with playtime, indoor counter-current pool and daily walking and exercise will guarantee optimum comfort, security, and professional care.

What do we care about?

a. Fun

We offer both indoor and outdoor play area for pets of any age. We focus on interactive games to keep them occupied and mingle with other dogs. Spending time with fellow pet proves to boost oxytocin in animals.

b. Attention

We take a certain number of pets at a time, so we can dedicate needed attention to every pet. Providing special attention helps in preventing solitary and odd behavior in pets.

c. Exercise

An optimum portion of the daycare focuses on physical and creative exercise to keep them healthy and smart. Treating them after every game boosts their spirit.

d. Rest

An average pet sleeps 12-14 hours a day. An active pup may need 18-20 hours of sleep, hence, we ensure that your pet takes enough rest and in a homely environment in the daycare.

e. Socialize

It’s important for pets to learn to socialize with other pets and humans, hence, we encourage the inclusive facilities to let dogs sit with their likes and help them interact with owners.

8 Common Dog Paw Problems

Unlike humans, dogs walk around in their four. The dog paws comprise of a thick layer of pads that help to hold its weight and protect from minor scratches.

Composition of Dog’s paw

Along with bones and cartilages, the dog’s paw includes skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels and connective tissue. The digital and metacarpal pads work as shock absorbers and help protect the bones and joints in the foot. The outer layer or carpal pads work like brakes, of sorts, and help the dog navigate slippery or steep slopes.

The feel of their pads differs according to their surrounding. Dogs that are outside a lot and exposed to rough surfaces have thicker and rougher paw skin while those who stay indoors have softer pads.

A dog’s paw isn’t free from problems. Get in touch with doggy daycare in Des Moines to ascertain common dog paw problems.

8 common Dog Paw Problem

A dog’s paw can attract different kinds of problems. The weather and climate, daily diet, lifestyle, and hygiene may determine the condition of dog paws.

a. Allergies

Dogs are prone to allergies. The allergic condition can make their paws very itchy. They will typically bite, lick, or chew on them to attempt to relieve the itching. In some cases, excessive licking of the paw can cause irritation or injury and can make it more susceptible to secondary fungal and bacterial infections.

b. Fungal and Bacterial Infections

The fungal or bacterial infection is common in canines. Many different species of bacteria and fungi normally live on your dog’s paw however they only become an issue when these organisms can grow out of control and cause infection. Signs of an infection include redness, swelling, pain, itching, and drainage. Yeast and ringworm are the most common fungus that may infect your pets’ paws.

c. Nail issues

Long toenails are common and can have a lot of negative consequences for your dog. Long nails can make it more difficult for your dog to walk.

Ingrown nails that those which are not trimmed properly or naturally worn down by walking outside can become painful ingrown toenails.

Torn or fractured nails occur when your dog catches their toenail on something. Fractured nails are generally caused by accidents.

d. Dry and Cracked Paw Pads

Warm weather, exposure to the rough surface, winter, chemicals, dry air, and excessive licking can cause dry and cracked paw pads. Dry and cracked paws can be painful and put your dog at a risk for infection.

e. Burns and Blisters

Dogs can suffer burns or blisters in the hot weather! The hot pavement or asphalt road can cause your dog to suffer a burn. If it is too hot for you to walk outside barefoot, it is too hot for your dogs, too! Always feel the pavement with the bottom of your bare hand before letting your dog walk on it. If you cannot comfortably hold your palm to the asphalt for 10 seconds or more, it is too hot for your dog’s paws.

f. Cuts and Abrasions

Cuts, abrasions, or lacerations are caused by walking on sharper objects such as broken glass, small rocks, and sticks, burrs, etc. You must be careful when you allow your dog to play outdoors. Keep them off of any surface you aren’t familiar with.

g. Parasites

Dogs who roam around outdoors can easily get tick infection. Ticks hideout between a pet’s toes where they can cause all sorts of problems, including pain and infection. You must consult a vet to remove the tick. If you remove it yourself, be prepared to use tweezers or special tick removal tools to grip the tick from the head and gently pull it out.

h. Cysts and Growths

Cysts are the sac of tissues that are filled with another substance, such as air or fluid. Cysts, lumps, and growths can commonly occur on paws or in-between your dog’s toes. Contact your veterinarian if you spot one and they can treat and remove if necessary.

How to protect your Dog’s paws?

Always consult with doggy daycare in Des Moines to diagnose dog paw problems. Here is what you can do to prevent serious paw infections and injuries.

i. Keep your dog's nails trimmed

Long nails for the dog are always problematic. They can unnecessarily spread their toes when they walk and the empty spaces between their toes will accumulate dust or snow. Untrimmed nails can also affect your dog's weight distribution, pushing their overall weight onto the back of their feet. Keep your dog’s nails trimmed and short all the time. If your dog often wanders outside, you must take extra precautions with their nails.

ii. Trim the fur between Toe pads

By trimming the fur between their toe pads you’ll level the pad fur with the pads themselves. This prevents snow, salt, and grit from accumulating between the toes. Compacted snow salt on your dog's feet makes walking difficult for them and can also affect their ability to stay on their feet.

iii. Lubricate paws before heading outdoors

Cold weather, ice, and salt can cause your dog's pads to dry out and crack. You can prevent this by wiping his paws with Vaseline or cooking spray before you take him out for a walk. Be sure to keep him off slick surfaces inside the house, such as tile, and outside the house, such as ice.

iv. Consider dog booties

Dog booties are a great way to keep your dog's feet safe and in good condition, particularly when the ground is hot, wet, or snowy. Dog booties are like human shoes that provide optimum protection dust, heat, snow, and other forms of dust. Wearing booties can be difficult for dogs. Try a gradual approach and let them sink into it for a while. Let them wear booties inside the house for short periods of time and offer them a prize or treats

v. Check your De-icer

De-icer is used during winter to de-ice the icy particles on cars. It can produce salt and other ice-melting granules or chemicals that can irritate your dog's paws when contacted. It can also cause stomach ailments if ingested. When choosing a De-icer you should consider buying non-toxic options, such as sand, gravel, and non-clumping cat litters. If you do use salt or chemical deicers, choose to buy "pet safe" brands. Keep the chemicals inside the shelf all the time.

vi. Wash your dog's paws after walks

After roaming outside, consider washing their feet with warm water. This helps to warm up their cold paws. It will also wash off any salt or deicing chemicals residue formed between their toes.

vii. Apply Vaseline on Dog’s Paws

The snow, ice, and salt can cause your dog's pads to dry out and crack. You should consider wiping their paws with Vaseline or cooking spray before you take them outdoors. Consider keeping them off slick surfaces inside the house, such as tile, and outside the house, such as ice.

 

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines specializing in pet care, pet health, and diet.

Mentally and Physically Strong: Work Ethic Carries Military Veterinarian

Mentally and physically strong: Work ethic carries Army veterinarian

It isn’t unusual to hear about a random act of kindness. We have seen instances where a person went to a great length to save the life of another being.

A military veterinarian saved the lives of two dogs at New Hampshire following a usual event. Here is the story about the night she saved two lives.

Work ethic carries Army veterinarian

Danica Goodheart is a Military Veterinarian. She graduated from Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016 and proceeded to work for 2 years as an ER veterinarian in a 24/7 Emergency and Specialty Hospital.

One cold night in 2016 at an emergency veterinary clinic in Concord, New Hampshire, she encountered two fatally wounded dogs. She had completed working the overnight shift when a middle-aged couple emerged from the winter cold carrying a bleeding pit bull. Moments later another man walked in clutching a wet and injured golden retriever.

The two dogs had grappled with another dog on a frozen lake. Police fired at the dogs in an attempt to break up the fight however ended up hitting a bullet to one of the dogs.

Goodheart continuously worked on the pit bull for two hours. She treated the bullet wound after the projectile had torn through its abdomen. She treated the pit bull for hypothermia and bite wounds.

After saving their lives, Goodheart approached elderly couples. They were ecstatic to learn that their pet would survive.

She later mentioned in the interview:

"I will never forget the look on their faces."

Goodheart’s co-worker Capt. Chelsi Blume mentioned:

"She will put 110 percent effort into whatever she's doing,"

A Fitness Freak

A fitness junkie since her teen years, she has continued to train and keep in peak shape. She spends up to 25 hours a week in the gym.

She was placed first in her first bodybuilding competition at the Jay Cutler Classic in Richmond, Virginia in August 2019. She won the overall figure championship for women.

She had only trained for four months as a bodybuilder. She hired strength coach Nic Wightman shortly after arriving at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

She has always been an athlete and a fitness freak. She even competed in Division I track at the University of New Hampshire.

In addition, she has built meal plans for fellow Soldiers and friends to help them get in shape.

She has been active in the military as a veterinarian since 2016. She is assigned to the 248th Medical Veterinarian Medical Detachment at Fort Bragg. Along with a seven-person staff, she is charged with the medical care of military working dogs deployed on the field to detect drugs and explosives.

She explains that it takes resiliency to meet the demands of the position, which requires veterinarians to constantly train and prepare for a variety of duties, including providing preventive medicine, outpatient care and disease control for pets at military installations.

Even before joining the military, she had understood how to work under duress, having already dealt with the pressures of working in the ER. There she tended to injured dogs and cats and even injured animals found by roadsides.

This April, Goodheart will take part in Defender 2020 a multi-national joint military exercise that will test the Army's ability to project its capabilities from the U.S. to Europe.

In her early life, she grew up in the sprawling 100-acre farm on the eastern shore of New Hampshire’s Lakes Region.

"I was always around animals," Goodheart said. "My mother has a very strong passion for animals and instilled that in us girls."

While attending high school, Goodheart learned of the importance of military working dogs, who often must go into harm's way when searching for explosive devices. That helped spur her toward a career as an Army veterinary doctor.

Veterinary Careers in the Military

If you’re willing to become a Military Veterinarian you will uphold the highest form of service.

The military vets are not only assigned to treat military canines but also provide veterinary services to military family pets at bases all over the world.

The military vets may perform a wide range of medical services including pet surgery. Along with the military animals and family pets, veterinarians in the military also play a big role in supporting the public health mission for the community. They extensively work with physicians and preventive medicine experts to develop zoonotic disease prevention strategies, especially focusing on rabies on rabies-prone areas.

They also supervise and inspect food items supplied to military service members and their families. This includes traveling abroad to perform audits on food and beverage manufacturing facilities to make sure that they are following the proper food safety standards.

The US Military offer appealing options for veterinarians considering serving a full 20-year career. Through the Long-Term Health Education & Training program, the military will pay for veterinarians to go back to school for an MPH, Ph.D., or any number of clinical and research-oriented residency programs.

Requirements to Be a Military Vet

Veterinarians looking to enter the Military must meet the same standards and physical fitness requirements as all other soldiers.

They will be subjected to an evaluation of your medical history and an intense medical exam before even being accepted as the military vet.

They also have to take a physical fitness test 4x per year that measures their ability to meet certain minimum requirements for pushups, situps, and a two-mile run.

Finally, their height and weight are measured at each of these tests to ensure that they meet the standard. The requirements are different for men and women, and they also change based on your age.

You must understand the importance of veterinary before considering to be enlisted in the military as the veterinarian. The most important thing that Military veterinarians must comprehend is that they are not ultimately in control of their lives and careers during their time in service. The deployment and active service area are designated by seeing where you fit the best.