Kittens need Socialization too

A newborn or juvenile cat is known as a kitten. Alike most juvenile pets, kittens need constant attention and familiarity with the outside world. Most kittens are prone to loneliness and many ailments related to isolation.

After being born, kittens are totally dependent on the mother cat for survival. After two weeks of birth, kittens start exploring the outside world and starting eating after three to four weeks. The time between 2-8 weeks is considered the best time for introducing kittens to socialization skills. Domestic kittens are highly social animals and usually enjoy human companionship.


Why kittens should be socialized?

  • Socialization teaches a kitten how to be a cat.
  • Proper feline manners and how to communicate with other felines help in bonding with other pets
  • It also helps them to ascertain who their enemies are.

Three T's of Kitten Socialization

The most trainers focus on three T’s of socialization for cats. These are; Touching, Talking, and Timing.

Touching

Touching is the most essential part of any grooming or nurturing process. Mothers tend to care their newborn with their touch to provide the warmth and protection. Touching a kitten helps them realize that they shouldn’t fear humans. It offers them a chance to get close to their pet owners.

  • Touching kittens help them remember your scent which helps to them to associate the memories spent with you and bring closeness.
  • Petting is one of the first sensations newborns feel when they come in contact with mother cats. Petting gives them a wonderful safe experience.
  • Comforting touch helps to reduce blood pressure, and improve heart rate and brainwave.
  • While handling the kitten, be sure to touch its ears, tail, paws, and mouth so the experience is comforting and pleasing. Keep it as a routine.

Talking

Pets can very well interpret most basic words and gestures.

  • Talking to the kitten teaches them to listen and pay attention to your voice. It brings familiarity between you and your pet.
  • The often you speak to your cat, the better they will understand and react to you. This enhances and improves your relationship.

Timing

Timing is the third most important chapter on kitten grooming. Training them during the 2 weeks to 8 weeks of their life helps them grasp the skills better. Kittens won't know what's right and what's wrong unless you tell them at the right time.

Catching them during the act or mischief can help them disciplined. Timing also helps to offer rewards to kittens to follow the routine and become more dedicated.


Learn more about pet training and grooming.

The Grooming Brushes for your Dog

Dog grooming is a process by which dog’s appearance is enhanced. It not only enhances the appeal but also keeps your pet hygienic and clean. It is also essential to keep your pet stress free and comfortable, especially those with long or heavy coats.

Much like your dog, pet brushes come in just about every shape or sizes. As a pet owner, you must first consider your pet’s coat and the grooming need to determine what brush to buy.


Types of Pet Brush

Slicker brush

A Slicker Brush is primarily designed to get rid of any debris, loose hair and mats/ knots in the fur. It is typically rectangular in shape and has fine wire bristles, packed tightly together. This type of brush works with all pet coats.

Each wire bristle is angled slightly as to not scratch the skin, however, you must be cautious while using this type of brush as it tends to be sharper. You shouldn’t apply heavy pressure on it.

Pin brush

Pin brush is often a wooden brush with wire pins that have a protective ball at the end to prevent scratching the skin.

It’s made for longer and silkier coat types. It’s usually recommended for show dogs –who have long fur coats.

Bristle brush

The bristle brush is best suited for dogs with short or wiry coats. The bristles remove debris and leave a nice shine. It can also be used on double coated dogs (a soft undercoat and weather-resistant outer coat), such as Collies and Huskies.

Shedding blade

Shedding blade is a brush in a horseshoe shape comb with small, harmless teeth used for shedding loose fur. A shedding blade works several ways, but you must ensure caution to avoid any injury to your dog. Do not apply heavy pressure when brushing with a shedding blade, especially around sensitive areas like the groin and bony projections

Undercoat rake

The undercoat rake looks like a pin brush, but with fewer and longer pins. It’s designed to get deep into double and heavy coats of dogs.

On most shedding breeds, it can remove dead and fuzzy undercoat in minutes, and leave the top coat shiny and healthy. On harsh-coated dogs, they mimic the hand-stripped look quickly and easily. Undercoat rakes can be used on a wet or a dry.


Check Pet Grooming to learn more about best brush for you dogs.

How often do you groom your dog?

Dog grooming is a process by which dog’s appearance is enhanced. It not only enhances the appeal but also keeps your pet hygienic and clean. It is also essential to keep your pet stress free and comfortable, especially those with long or heavy coats.

A person who professionally grooms the dog is known as dog groomer or Groomer. The grooming procedure, time and tools differ from one breed to another and one coat type to another.


5 benefits of Regular Grooming

  1. Eradicate Health Problem –Grooming lessens any chances of various health problems, such as skin allergy, parasitic infections, scratches and matted hair.
  2. Cleanliness –General tidiness and physical appearance is ensured by regular and proper grooming.
  3. Vital Organs in Check –Grooming also monitors the status of essential body parts for the infection, such as; Eyes, Ear and Teeth, Nose, Underside, Skin Coat, Nail and Pads etc.
  4. Physical Appeal –The physical appearance and standard is maintained with regular grooming.
  5. Stress-free environment –Matted hair, long and burly fur can cause stress to many dogs on daily basis. Grooming keeps them comfortable and happy.

Grooming based on Coat Type

Short haired

Short-haired dogs may require fewer baths and grooming to keep them clean. Grooming every 5-6 months is generally enough. They can be bathed every 4 months. Short haired canines like German Shephard may shed excessively. You can ask your groomer for any low-shed services. Keep in mind that nothing will stop shedding entirely, not even shaving your dog.

Short hair and double coated

These kind of dogs typically shed seasonally. You can choose to groom them four times a year to keep them clean and prevent excessive shedding. They require bath every 6 weeks to keep their coat clean and also to protect their natural oil. Golden Retriever is a popular short haired doubled coated dog which requires constant grooming and bathe.

Long hair and double coated

These dogs may frequently suffer from matted and overweighed hair. Matted hair invites moist, infection and allergies. They tend to shed seasonally and have long feathers on their feet, legs, bellies, butts, and ears that needs to be trimmed often.

You must never shave your double coated dog, as they are unable to grow their top layer coat back! Akita, Alaskan Husky, Alaskan malamute, American Eskimo, Chinook, Chow Chow, Finnish Spitz and Finnish Lapphund few examples of long haired double coated dog.

Thick Undercoated

Thick undercoated dogs require proper grooming to ensure their thick undercoat remains safe. These undercoat must be removed seasonally but never shaved. Shaving may cause severe skin problem, allergy and sunburn.

Thick undercoated dogs require grooming at least every three months. Golden Retrievers, Huskies, Collies, Shelties and Shepherds are dogs with thick undercoat.

Silky coated

The single coat on dogs tend to be silkier which grows continuously, hence it must be trimmed periodically. They can be groomed every 2-3 months. Some may require grooming every 4-6 weeks to prevent severe matting. Afghan hound, Maltese dog, Shih Tzu, Skye terrier, Tibetan terrier and Yorkshire terrier are few examples of silky coated dogs.

Curvy or Wavy coated

These dogs are the most likely to mat because of the excess of hair and chances of entanglement. Any hair longer than half an inch should be brushed at least twice a week; and hair longer than an inch should be brushed daily.

They may require grooming every four to six weeks to prevent severe matting. Curly coated retriever, Pumi, Portugese water dog, irish water spaniel, Lagotto Romagnolo and Poodle are few of the curvy or wavy coated dogs.


Check Pet grooming to learn more about proper grooming technique and professional help.