How do I potty train my dog in just 7 days?

It isn’t easy to get your new dog to relieve itself in a designated place. Anyone who has brought a new pup or an untrained dog home must know they have to spend countless hours training their pet to poo in a designed place.

Training your new dog to poo in a designed place isn’t always the first thing you should do. First, you should start with housebreaking your pup. As you begin, keep in mind that fully housebreaking your puppy can take four to six months of consistency and patience.

When to start potty training?

This is the most discussed question among the dog trainers, when do you start potty training? Many canine experts advice to start potty training is between 12 and 16 weeks old. By that age, the dog will have enough control over its bladder and bowel movement.
The dogs which are housebroken can easily adapt to potty training. Even after initial house training, most dogs still need a few weeks of practice to hold their bladder for a good amount of time.

How do I start potty training my dog?

The good news is that you can usually potty train your dog in just a week.

Size can be a predictor when it comes to potty training. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside. You Chihuahua is more likely to visit Powder Room than the big dogs like German Shepherd or Great Dane.

And while you're training, don’t worry if there are setbacks. Dogs may take time to adapt to a certain lifestyle. Don’t forget to reward them with a treat but just praise or pat after they’ve successfully relieved themselves in the designated spot.

The Seven Day Potty Training Schedule

  • Day of Training Goal
  • Day 1 Establish a consistent feeding schedule.
  • Day 2 Establish a consistent "potty break" schedule.
  • Day 3 Get your dog accustomed to relieving himself in the same location every time.
  • Day 4 Make sure you know the signs that your dog is about to go, and take him outside when appropriate.
  • Day 5 Less accidents inside the house should now be happening. When one happens, guide the dog outside to the potty spot.
  • Day 6 Check your dog's status.
  • Day 7 Reinforce weak areas.

Day 1
Start the day by establishing a regular feeding schedule that you'll be able to stick with. A consistent eating schedule will ensure that your dog relieves in a consistent routine. Be wary about your dog's dietary requirements. Pups compared to dogs need to be fed 3 or 4 times a day with enough water to help digest their meal.

Day 2
You'll basically continue with your first day's schedule. Strictly stick to the schedule and feed your dog on a regular basis. Take them to the loo the first thing in the morning as well as just before you go to bed at night.
Smaller dogs and young pups should be taken for loo after every hour or so during the day. Young pups relieve themselves up to five times a day.
Every time it does its business, you can offer it a treat and verbal praise to bolster its motivation.

Day 3
You should use this day to pinpoint an exact location where your dog should defecate and pee. Start taking them to the spot at all times when they must relieve themselves. This will be their "potty spot." After each routine, you can offer them a treat.

Day 4
On day four, you can start by noticing and working with potty signals. Work on spotting the signs that your dog is about to go. You must allow yourself time and patience to keep an eye on their behavior.
By learning this method, you can rush them outside to a specific location whenever they exhibit signals.

Day 5
By day five, your dog will somewhat get used to relieving on that specific spot. All you'll need to do is guide them outside. In the case of young pups, the occasional accidents could continue but let yourself down. Continue with the schedule.
When your pup accidentally relieves inside the house, you should punish it. Let them know this by clapping loudly then immediately take it outside to the potty spot. Each time it's able to relieve on the potty spot, reward it a treat.

Day 6
Day six is a status check day. By this time, your dog will make significant progress. The whole idea is to train your dog to visit the potty spot by itself or signal you to take it there whenever they need to relieve it.

Day 7
After a week of consistent potty training, your dog will get used to this schedule. Don't forget to punish them every time they accidentally defecate inside the house. It's important to instill good value in them.

You can start gradually slowing the treats, so they get used to their potty schedule without any rewards.

  • Few Basic Guidelines
  • In the case of a small pup, you can train them to wait for at least three before going to the loo. A two-month puppy can hold its bladder for three hours. You have to teach them to wait three hours. For bigger and older dogs, the time length span can be over 5-6 hours. 
  • Do remember, pups often need to go outside after waking up, eating, chewing their toys and playing, etc. 
  • Every month, you can start adding one hour to the puppy’s tolerance. This can go up to about eight hours a day. 
  • Eight hours is the maximum. Even the biggest adult dogs shouldn’t be expected to hold it for more than eight hours.
  • Don’t immediately start at the maximum time possible for your pup just because it can hold it for over three hours. Train them to a certain schedule gradually so they’re less likely to make mistakes.

Things to Remember

  • Be Direct - Always take your dog directly to the potty spot. Don't take your pup for a walk around or sniff around things. The commute should be direct from the house to the potty.
  • Offer treats - Always offers treat and rewards when they go outside. you can gradually lessen the treats when they get used to the potty schedule.
  • Don’t make potty the last part of the trip -Don’t end the trip outside as soon as they pee. This will teach them to hold it as long as possible
  • Be patient - Getting your dog to defecate or pee immediately can be a difficult affair. Instead, treat this as a boring time for yourself and your dog. No playtime after late-night potty breaks.
  • Go back inside immediately if they don't relieve - Take them inside to the house immediately if they don't defecate. Try again in the next 20-30 minutes.
  • Monitor your dog's access to water before bedtime to reduce late-night potty breaks.

Here is the brief infographics about for the advice on how to potty train your dog in just 7 days.

It isn’t easy to housebreak or potty train your dog. You’d need to be prepared mentally to effectively potty train your dog. Get in touch with Urban Pet Hospital & Resort, the best doggy daycare in Urbandale., for training your dogs and the best doggy daycare service.

 

 

 

Most Effective Tactics for Training Your Dogs At Home

It is easy to inhibit basic commands in dogs when they are young and intuitive. Dog trainers and behaviorists insist on providing basic commands for training your dogs at an early age to prevent any difficulty faced by them in later years.

Trainers suggest that you can start training your dog at home by adhering to effective tactics by engaging, rewarding, and positive disciplining them.

When it comes to training a canine, you could find many known techniques such as reward-based training, scientific training, operant conditioning, pack leaders, positive reinforcement, dominance theory, the Koehler method, Cesar’s way, etc. The list goes on. But one technique doesn't always fit all.

Regardless of which method and techniques you use, effective dog training boils down to one thing-controlling the consequences of your dog’s behavior. If you want to influence the way your dog behaves, you need to:

Reward behaviors you like.

Make sure behaviors you don’t like aren’t rewarded.

Most effective tactics for training your dogs at home

Positive Reinforcement

Positive reinforcement is the most talked about and popular method for canine training. It was popularized by trainers like Dawn Sylvia-Stasiewicz, who trained the Obamas’ dog, Bo.

The theory of “Positive Reinforcement” suggests that you should reward your dog for good behavior. If you reward them, they’re more likely to repeat good behavior. On the contrary, bad behavior does not get a reward or acknowledgment. However, the dog owners must practice positive disciplining to demotivate dogs from repeating bad behavior such as removal of rewards, like a toy or treat is taken away.

This method of training is often combined with clicker training which gives the dog a distinct sign of the exact moment the behavior was completed. Commands also need to be short and to the point such as Sit, Stay, and Come.

Start with continuous rewards every time your dog does the right thing. Then, gradually move to intermittent rewards as the behavior becomes consistent. It can also be easy to overfeed during the training, hence try using small treats or avoid using food every time you reward them.

It relies on four points:

  • Positive reinforcement –It reinforces their positive behavior.
  • Positive punishment -It discourages any behavior by adding something the dog sees as unpleasant.
  • Negative reinforcement – It increases behavior by taking something away that’s unpleasant.
  • Negative punishment – It demotivates behavior by taking something away that’s desirable.

Scientific Training

Scientific training is a mixture of lots of different training methods that are continuously analyzed, tested, and improved. Science-based dog training can be difficult to define as it relies on information that is continually building and changing.

The trainers aim to understand dogs’ nature, their ability to be conditioned, and the effectiveness of rewards and punishments while training any canine. Hence, training a dog slightly differs from training another dog.

Trainers work hand in hand with animal behaviorists who are constantly creating new studies and experiments to comprehend dog’s psychology. This method relies heavily on these studies to work with dogs. It relies on operant conditioning

Operant conditioning, sometimes referred to as instrumental conditioning, is a method of learning that employs rewards and punishments for behavior.

It mostly follows positive reinforcement and, less often, some forms of punishment. Trainers believe that it’s important to reward the positive behavior of dogs and punish the bad behavior to discourage its repetition. This method also relies on dog psychology to find ways to improve off-leash relationships between owners and their pups.

Clicker Training

Clicker training is the most basic form of a pet training method. It heavily relies on operant conditioning and follows the same principles as positive reinforcement. Mostly, it’s grouped in as a method of positive reinforcement, rather than as its own form of training.

The trainer relies on a device to make a quick, sharp noise, such as a clicker or whistle or to address a dog when a wanted behavior is accomplished. The advantage of using clicker training is that it helps dogs to easily comprehend and imbibe the desired behavior. As every good behavior is rewarded, the clicker also helps to signal the dog that with the completion of every command they’ll receive a treat.

First, the dog needs to be conditioned to know that a click means a reward is coming. Then the dog can associate a behavior with a click and a reward. Finally, verbal command can be introduced to form a new association.

Electronic Training

Electronic training is a bit extreme method of training a dog. It relies on the use of an electric collar that delivers a minimal electric shock or a spray of citronella when your dog is not performing the desired task. It’s mostly used for training at a distance when a leash can’t be used.

Shock collars are very effective when training a dog to stay within boundaries of an un-fenced yard or to teach them to work in fields or do hunting work. Unlike the popular belief, people who rely on shock collar claim that there’s less risk of a dog getting hurt than with choke collars or other mechanical devices.

This method mostly relies on punishment for bad behavior instead of rewards. Professional trainers believe that this may help the dog learn what they shouldn’t do, rather than what they should do. Using continuous punishment can also lead to a great deal of stress and permanent anxiety issues for dogs. It can be a weapon in an inexperienced hand.

Model-Rival or Mirror Training

The model-rival method of training, also known as mirror training, believes that dogs can learn by observing other dogs. By providing a model of good behavior or a rival to compete for resources, dogs learn to mimic behaviors.

This method may use another human or animal act as the model. The trainer will praise them for completing tasks on command or punishing them for unwanted behavior. The dog, as an observer, will learn from the observation. The model can also be used to act as a rival, competing to do the right task for a desired toy or treat as a reward, encouraging the dog to pick up on the task and accomplish it more quickly.

As the term stands, mirror training relies on mimicking good behavior. To put it simply, the dog learns by example. This training method is equally successful in training a canine as positive reinforcement or clicker training.

It’s also easier for the dog owners who spend a lot of time with their pets. Your dog spends a lot of time observing you and following you around making it easier to conduct the training at any time.

Alpha Dog or Dominance

Alpha dog or dominance training relies on a dog’s instinctual pack mentality to create a relationship of submission and dominance. It relies on the theory that dogs will follow a social hierarchy, as observed in captive wolf packs. When a dog sees themselves as the alpha, they need to learn to instead respect their human as the alpha and submit.

Trainers conduct this method by learning a dog’s body language and responding accordingly, projecting confidence and authority, and going first when it comes to eating, entering or leaving rooms, or walking on a leash.

The alpha training follows a strict guideline that enables your dog to understand that they must submit to you. You forbid them from sleeping with you on the same bed or eat on the same furniture. You also don’t get down to your dog’s eye level. That’s because these are signs that your dog has equal standing in the relationship. You are in charge; you are dominant.

Many modern trainers are critical of this method and claim that pet dogs do not rely on pack mentality as much as previously thought.

Relationship-Based Training

Relationship-based training relies on combining different training methods into one. It focuses on a more individualized approach for both dog and owner where the relationship between dog and human drives everything.

This method can help meet the needs of the dog and the trainer and helps to foster communication. It also helps to build a stronger bond between the human and the animal.

The trainer relies on understanding the dog’s body language. They also rely on positive reinforcement techniques such as rewarding good behavior and punishing bad behavior.

The dog’s environment is controlled to limit possible unwanted behaviors. New information is built on previous success.

There are many animal training methods and techniques you can adopt to train your own dog. Although it can be difficult for most new pet owners to conduct training at home by them, trainers can always step in to assist you whenever needed.

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the best doggy daycare in Urbandale. Our in-house trainers can always help you with training your dogs. Being a pet hospital in Urbandale, we can always provide immediate medical assistance to your dog.

Diabetes among Dogs

Alike humans, dogs may suffer from diabetes too. There are two types of diabetes common in dogs.

  • Diabetes Insipidus
  • Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" because it is a rare diabetes which often leads to failure in regulating body’s water content.

Diabetes mellitus or Diabetes in general is a common disease in middle-aged and older dogs. It’s a complex disorder of carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism in dogs. It can be the result of a relative or absolute insulin deficiency or of peripheral cell insensitivity to insulin which is characterized by high blood glucose concentrations such that the renal threshold is exceeded.

It is a disease of the pancreas. Diabetes typically occurs when dogs are between 4 to 14 years old. Unspayed female dogs are twice as likely as male dogs to suffer from diabetes.

The Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs

  • Change in appetite
  • Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption
  • Weight loss
  • Increased urination
  • Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath
  • Lethargy
  • Dehydration
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Vomiting
  • Cataract formation, blindness
  • Chronic skin infections

Types of Diabetes Mellitus

There are two types of Diabetes Mellitus.

  • Type I is an insulin dependent diabetes which results from total or near complete destruction of the beta-cells. It is more common form of Diabetes mellitus among dogs. Most forms of diabetes can be managed with insulin, however, dietary and lifestyle improvements are also essential.
  • Type II is a non-insulin dependent diabetes because some insulin producing cells remain in the body, however, the amount produced is insufficient or the tissues of dog’s body is resistant to it. It commonly occurs in older obese dogs.

The breeds which are more prone to Diabetes are;

  • Cocker Spaniel
  • Dachshund
  • Doberman Pinscher
  • German Shepherd
  • Golden Retriever
  • Labrador Retriever
  • Pomeranian
  • Terrier
  • Toy Poodle

When you know the cause, the vets can look into the diagnosis and possible treatment, however, the effective treatment is only possible during the early onset of the disease.

How often do you visit for Well Checks?

A well check or wellness examination is a periodic medical tests of the pets to assess their overall health. A wellness examination may also be called a 'check-up' or a 'physical examination'. The necessity of a well check is to ensure that your dog remains healthy throughout its life. A well check may also include regular shots for rabies, flu etc.

"The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommends for dogs and cats to have check-ups annually, at least."


How often to visit Vets?

The time and duration for well checks or periodical visits may differ according to the age of the dog.

Puppy

In general, you should take your pup to your vet every 3 to 4 weeks for necessary vaccinations and to check if it’s developing any complications or other physical infirmities. The regular check may include, shots for rabies and distemper-parvo. Your pup might need shots if it’s displaying symptoms of kennel cough, influenza or Lyme disease.

Adult Dogs

Adult dogs range from the age between 1 to 7 years (depending on breed). These dogs require annual wellness check, including a heart worm test and other tests your vet recommends based on the results of the check.

A booster shots for rabies and distemper-parvo can be essential, typically every 3 years (note that there are state laws which mandate the frequency of rabies shots—your vet will tell you when you need to bring your dog in for his rabies shots).

Older Dogs

Older dogs range from the age between 7 to 10 years. These dogs require wellness check every 6 months or bi-annually. Alike humans, older dogs are prone to developing certain diseases and complications as they get older, including arthritis, gum disease, diabetes, vision problems and blindness, kidney disease, cancer, and dementia.


What to expect in Wellness Check?

Pre Examination

To better assess the need for well check, you vet will inquire about your dog’s diet, exercise, thirst, breathing, behavior, habits, elimination patterns (i.e., bowel movements and urination), lifestyle, and general health.

When you schedule a well check, your vet might ask for urine or stool sample too. It’s mandatory that you keep records of your dog’s previous tests, check-up, illness and medical history.

Physical Examination

The thorough physical examination includes;

  1. Alertness and appearance: Does your dog appear bright, alert and responsive?
  2. Evaluation of gait: Is there any stiffness, lameness, swelling or asymmetry?
  3. Skin and hair coat: Check for inflammation on skin or hair loss and hair quality.
  4. Body Condition Score (BCS): On a scale of 1-9, a number is assigned to indicate if your dog is underweight, overweight or ideal weight. A score of 5 indicates an ideal body weight.
  5. Overall Measurement: The overall measurement may include assessing the body weight, body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and capillary refill time.
  6. Examination of face and mouth: This includes overall tests of eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and throat etc.
  7. Palpation of lymph nodes: Are any enlarged or painful?
  8. Auscultation: Are there unusual breath sounds, a heart murmur, or a heart rhythm abnormality? Auscultation is performed on both sides of the chest.
  9. Palpation of the abdomen: Are there areas of discomfort or palpable abnormalities?
  10. Rectal examination: Are there any growths present within or around the rectum? Is the prostate gland enlarged or painful? Is the stool normal?

Check Pet Medical Services to learn more about pet health and well checks.