Choosing a doggy daycare

Doggy Daycare or pet daycare is the one-stop pet care center for canines. Like a nursery for small kids, doggy daycare is designed to cater to pets when the owners are away for work or travel.

Doggy daycare isn’t only a place to board your pets but a place for them to learn essential social skills, enjoy different games and explore different kinds of mental and physical stimulation.

Benefits of choosing a doggy daycare

  • Socialization
  • Exercise
  • Teaching Learning Center
  • Peace of mind for the owner
  • Safety
  • Relieves boredom and anxiety
  • Relieves loneliness
  • Lots of affection
  • Provides routine
  • Affordable

But daycare is not a one-size-fits-all solution, and daycares vary considerably in quality. You must choose the right daycare. But how do you know which daycare is right for your pet? Let’s take a look at how daycare differs from others.

Choosing a Doggy Daycare

How do you choose the best daycare for your pet? The list is endless. Although every doggy daycare may advertise as one of the premier institutions, you must be wary about what’s best for your pet.

Here are some of the criteria that you must seek to fulfill to find the best doggy daycare.

A. Tour the Facilities

The first thing you should do as a concerned pet owner is to look around the facility first-hand. Nothing else can give you’re a better impression of the facility than visiting the place. It's essential to ascertain if the environment your dog will be hanging out in is clean and properly sanitized. You'll also want to learn about the safety precautions the owner has put in place.

Dog Daycare safety features should include:

  1. Ventilation –Ventilation is important in any building. The weather outside can hugely impact the weather inside the building. Make sure fresh air is getting to the dogs, whether it's through open doors or the Air Conditioner.
  2. Proper fencing –Animals are a curious being and can escape the compound without the staff ever noticing. Check the facility for proper fencing that is strong enough to resist the weight of a dog and high enough to keep adventurous dogs from jumping over. Double gating provides a space for the dog to get acclimated to the play area before it joins the other dogs inside, which can improve safety.
  3. Safe floors –Rubber and epoxy floors provide better grip and friction than slick linoleum or cold concrete.

B. Separate units for large and small dogs

A doggy daycare should split the dogs into groups and keep a different unit for large and small dogs. Along with the size, temperament and play style of the dog should be taken into account while splitting the group.

Keeping all the dogs in a single room can be a bad idea as it may cramp the space and create hostility between the dominant and passive canines. Unlike outdoor parks, daycares are the confined space. Dogs should be separated according to their temperament to avoid any trouble.

C. Ask About the Staff-to-Dog Ratio

Some states have a set dog-to-human ratio for dog daycares, and others don't. Ask the dog daycare owner about possible state guidelines. The experts suggest a ratio of 15 dogs per human as a safe standard. The IBPSA also notes that allowances are often made for more active groups, where a ratio of one staffer per 10 dogs is desired, or less active groups, where 20 dogs per staffer are adequate.

D. Pick a Daycare with Guided Activities

The dog owners should ask about the activities the dogs will do throughout the day. The activities can range from training, grooming, socializing, physical and mental stimulation, games, etc. Daycare activities should focus on improving your dog’s behavior. The behavioral skills instilled in your dog will help carry it throughout its lifetime.

E. Check the Toy Policy

Some dogs can be very aggressive with other dogs, particularly when they are protecting a toy they think is theirs. If you know your dog isn't going to get along with another dog or dogs with toys, dog owners should bring the issue to the attention of the daycare managers—they will keep a careful eye on your pup.

F. Ask about the Daycare’s Treat Policy

Some dog daycares use treats to reward good behavior, and some don't. Ask the daycare manager about their use of treats and be sure to tell them if your dog displays aggressive behavior around food or if he’s on a special diet of any kind.

G. Does your daycare provide Boarding?

Sometime, you may need to board your dog overnight in the facility. Ask if the daycare has boarding options available because it's always going to be easier for a dog to acclimate to an environment if he's already been there playing.

H. Affordable

A doggy daycare doesn’t need to expensive to become one of the best daycares. Many dog owners avoid expensive daycare because of the limited pet budget. When you assess a daycare, always ascertain the services and their prices. Depending on your area and how often your dog will attend, the cost of daycare can add up quickly. (Typical rates are around $15 to $30 per day.)

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the best doggy daycare in Des Moines. One of the premier doggy daycare in Des Moines we specialize in both daycare and boarding facilities.

We offer a home away from home experience. Our luxury suites available with TV/DVD and/or webcams, along with playtime, indoor counter-current pool and daily walking and exercise will guarantee optimum comfort, security, and professional care.

What do we care about?

a. Fun

We offer both indoor and outdoor play area for pets of any age. We focus on interactive games to keep them occupied and mingle with other dogs. Spending time with fellow pet proves to boost oxytocin in animals.

b. Attention

We take a certain number of pets at a time, so we can dedicate needed attention to every pet. Providing special attention helps in preventing solitary and odd behavior in pets.

c. Exercise

An optimum portion of the daycare focuses on physical and creative exercise to keep them healthy and smart. Treating them after every game boosts their spirit.

d. Rest

An average pet sleeps 12-14 hours a day. An active pup may need 18-20 hours of sleep, hence, we ensure that your pet takes enough rest and in a homely environment in the daycare.

e. Socialize

It’s important for pets to learn to socialize with other pets and humans, hence, we encourage the inclusive facilities to let dogs sit with their likes and help them interact with owners.

8 Common Dog Paw Problems

Unlike humans, dogs walk around in their four. The dog paws comprise of a thick layer of pads that help to hold its weight and protect from minor scratches.

Composition of Dog’s paw

Along with bones and cartilages, the dog’s paw includes skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels and connective tissue. The digital and metacarpal pads work as shock absorbers and help protect the bones and joints in the foot. The outer layer or carpal pads work like brakes, of sorts, and help the dog navigate slippery or steep slopes.

The feel of their pads differs according to their surrounding. Dogs that are outside a lot and exposed to rough surfaces have thicker and rougher paw skin while those who stay indoors have softer pads.

A dog’s paw isn’t free from problems. Get in touch with doggy daycare in Des Moines to ascertain common dog paw problems.

8 common Dog Paw Problem

A dog’s paw can attract different kinds of problems. The weather and climate, daily diet, lifestyle, and hygiene may determine the condition of dog paws.

a. Allergies

Dogs are prone to allergies. The allergic condition can make their paws very itchy. They will typically bite, lick, or chew on them to attempt to relieve the itching. In some cases, excessive licking of the paw can cause irritation or injury and can make it more susceptible to secondary fungal and bacterial infections.

b. Fungal and Bacterial Infections

The fungal or bacterial infection is common in canines. Many different species of bacteria and fungi normally live on your dog’s paw however they only become an issue when these organisms can grow out of control and cause infection. Signs of an infection include redness, swelling, pain, itching, and drainage. Yeast and ringworm are the most common fungus that may infect your pets’ paws.

c. Nail issues

Long toenails are common and can have a lot of negative consequences for your dog. Long nails can make it more difficult for your dog to walk.

Ingrown nails that those which are not trimmed properly or naturally worn down by walking outside can become painful ingrown toenails.

Torn or fractured nails occur when your dog catches their toenail on something. Fractured nails are generally caused by accidents.

d. Dry and Cracked Paw Pads

Warm weather, exposure to the rough surface, winter, chemicals, dry air, and excessive licking can cause dry and cracked paw pads. Dry and cracked paws can be painful and put your dog at a risk for infection.

e. Burns and Blisters

Dogs can suffer burns or blisters in the hot weather! The hot pavement or asphalt road can cause your dog to suffer a burn. If it is too hot for you to walk outside barefoot, it is too hot for your dogs, too! Always feel the pavement with the bottom of your bare hand before letting your dog walk on it. If you cannot comfortably hold your palm to the asphalt for 10 seconds or more, it is too hot for your dog’s paws.

f. Cuts and Abrasions

Cuts, abrasions, or lacerations are caused by walking on sharper objects such as broken glass, small rocks, and sticks, burrs, etc. You must be careful when you allow your dog to play outdoors. Keep them off of any surface you aren’t familiar with.

g. Parasites

Dogs who roam around outdoors can easily get tick infection. Ticks hideout between a pet’s toes where they can cause all sorts of problems, including pain and infection. You must consult a vet to remove the tick. If you remove it yourself, be prepared to use tweezers or special tick removal tools to grip the tick from the head and gently pull it out.

h. Cysts and Growths

Cysts are the sac of tissues that are filled with another substance, such as air or fluid. Cysts, lumps, and growths can commonly occur on paws or in-between your dog’s toes. Contact your veterinarian if you spot one and they can treat and remove if necessary.

How to protect your Dog’s paws?

Always consult with doggy daycare in Des Moines to diagnose dog paw problems. Here is what you can do to prevent serious paw infections and injuries.

i. Keep your dog's nails trimmed

Long nails for the dog are always problematic. They can unnecessarily spread their toes when they walk and the empty spaces between their toes will accumulate dust or snow. Untrimmed nails can also affect your dog's weight distribution, pushing their overall weight onto the back of their feet. Keep your dog’s nails trimmed and short all the time. If your dog often wanders outside, you must take extra precautions with their nails.

ii. Trim the fur between Toe pads

By trimming the fur between their toe pads you’ll level the pad fur with the pads themselves. This prevents snow, salt, and grit from accumulating between the toes. Compacted snow salt on your dog's feet makes walking difficult for them and can also affect their ability to stay on their feet.

iii. Lubricate paws before heading outdoors

Cold weather, ice, and salt can cause your dog's pads to dry out and crack. You can prevent this by wiping his paws with Vaseline or cooking spray before you take him out for a walk. Be sure to keep him off slick surfaces inside the house, such as tile, and outside the house, such as ice.

iv. Consider dog booties

Dog booties are a great way to keep your dog's feet safe and in good condition, particularly when the ground is hot, wet, or snowy. Dog booties are like human shoes that provide optimum protection dust, heat, snow, and other forms of dust. Wearing booties can be difficult for dogs. Try a gradual approach and let them sink into it for a while. Let them wear booties inside the house for short periods of time and offer them a prize or treats

v. Check your De-icer

De-icer is used during winter to de-ice the icy particles on cars. It can produce salt and other ice-melting granules or chemicals that can irritate your dog's paws when contacted. It can also cause stomach ailments if ingested. When choosing a De-icer you should consider buying non-toxic options, such as sand, gravel, and non-clumping cat litters. If you do use salt or chemical deicers, choose to buy "pet safe" brands. Keep the chemicals inside the shelf all the time.

vi. Wash your dog's paws after walks

After roaming outside, consider washing their feet with warm water. This helps to warm up their cold paws. It will also wash off any salt or deicing chemicals residue formed between their toes.

vii. Apply Vaseline on Dog’s Paws

The snow, ice, and salt can cause your dog's pads to dry out and crack. You should consider wiping their paws with Vaseline or cooking spray before you take them outdoors. Consider keeping them off slick surfaces inside the house, such as tile, and outside the house, such as ice.

 

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is a premier doggy daycare in Des Moines specializing in pet care, pet health, and diet.

Mentally and Physically Strong: Work Ethic Carries Military Veterinarian

Mentally and physically strong: Work ethic carries Army veterinarian

It isn’t unusual to hear about a random act of kindness. We have seen instances where a person went to a great length to save the life of another being.

A military veterinarian saved the lives of two dogs at New Hampshire following a usual event. Here is the story about the night she saved two lives.

Work ethic carries Army veterinarian

Danica Goodheart is a Military Veterinarian. She graduated from Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016 and proceeded to work for 2 years as an ER veterinarian in a 24/7 Emergency and Specialty Hospital.

One cold night in 2016 at an emergency veterinary clinic in Concord, New Hampshire, she encountered two fatally wounded dogs. She had completed working the overnight shift when a middle-aged couple emerged from the winter cold carrying a bleeding pit bull. Moments later another man walked in clutching a wet and injured golden retriever.

The two dogs had grappled with another dog on a frozen lake. Police fired at the dogs in an attempt to break up the fight however ended up hitting a bullet to one of the dogs.

Goodheart continuously worked on the pit bull for two hours. She treated the bullet wound after the projectile had torn through its abdomen. She treated the pit bull for hypothermia and bite wounds.

After saving their lives, Goodheart approached elderly couples. They were ecstatic to learn that their pet would survive.

She later mentioned in the interview:

"I will never forget the look on their faces."

Goodheart’s co-worker Capt. Chelsi Blume mentioned:

"She will put 110 percent effort into whatever she's doing,"

A Fitness Freak

A fitness junkie since her teen years, she has continued to train and keep in peak shape. She spends up to 25 hours a week in the gym.

She was placed first in her first bodybuilding competition at the Jay Cutler Classic in Richmond, Virginia in August 2019. She won the overall figure championship for women.

She had only trained for four months as a bodybuilder. She hired strength coach Nic Wightman shortly after arriving at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

She has always been an athlete and a fitness freak. She even competed in Division I track at the University of New Hampshire.

In addition, she has built meal plans for fellow Soldiers and friends to help them get in shape.

She has been active in the military as a veterinarian since 2016. She is assigned to the 248th Medical Veterinarian Medical Detachment at Fort Bragg. Along with a seven-person staff, she is charged with the medical care of military working dogs deployed on the field to detect drugs and explosives.

She explains that it takes resiliency to meet the demands of the position, which requires veterinarians to constantly train and prepare for a variety of duties, including providing preventive medicine, outpatient care and disease control for pets at military installations.

Even before joining the military, she had understood how to work under duress, having already dealt with the pressures of working in the ER. There she tended to injured dogs and cats and even injured animals found by roadsides.

This April, Goodheart will take part in Defender 2020 a multi-national joint military exercise that will test the Army's ability to project its capabilities from the U.S. to Europe.

In her early life, she grew up in the sprawling 100-acre farm on the eastern shore of New Hampshire’s Lakes Region.

"I was always around animals," Goodheart said. "My mother has a very strong passion for animals and instilled that in us girls."

While attending high school, Goodheart learned of the importance of military working dogs, who often must go into harm's way when searching for explosive devices. That helped spur her toward a career as an Army veterinary doctor.

Veterinary Careers in the Military

If you’re willing to become a Military Veterinarian you will uphold the highest form of service.

The military vets are not only assigned to treat military canines but also provide veterinary services to military family pets at bases all over the world.

The military vets may perform a wide range of medical services including pet surgery. Along with the military animals and family pets, veterinarians in the military also play a big role in supporting the public health mission for the community. They extensively work with physicians and preventive medicine experts to develop zoonotic disease prevention strategies, especially focusing on rabies on rabies-prone areas.

They also supervise and inspect food items supplied to military service members and their families. This includes traveling abroad to perform audits on food and beverage manufacturing facilities to make sure that they are following the proper food safety standards.

The US Military offer appealing options for veterinarians considering serving a full 20-year career. Through the Long-Term Health Education & Training program, the military will pay for veterinarians to go back to school for an MPH, Ph.D., or any number of clinical and research-oriented residency programs.

Requirements to Be a Military Vet

Veterinarians looking to enter the Military must meet the same standards and physical fitness requirements as all other soldiers.

They will be subjected to an evaluation of your medical history and an intense medical exam before even being accepted as the military vet.

They also have to take a physical fitness test 4x per year that measures their ability to meet certain minimum requirements for pushups, situps, and a two-mile run.

Finally, their height and weight are measured at each of these tests to ensure that they meet the standard. The requirements are different for men and women, and they also change based on your age.

You must understand the importance of veterinary before considering to be enlisted in the military as the veterinarian. The most important thing that Military veterinarians must comprehend is that they are not ultimately in control of their lives and careers during their time in service. The deployment and active service area are designated by seeing where you fit the best.