How to make your dog stop biting?

Exhibiting aggressive behavior is a common trait in most dogs. Every dog is capable of biting other animals and humans, regardless of their breed, size, or training. Hence, you must make sure that your dog doesn't exhibit such aggressive behavior at any point in time.

In most cases, canines suddenly become aggressive and attack the owner or other people which isn't natural.

According to a recent study, aggression has become the most common and serious behavioral issue among dogs. It’s also the number-one reason why pet parents seek professional help from behaviorists, trainers, and veterinarians because many times dogs may have an underlying medical problem which makes them exhibit aggressive behavior.

Is Playful Mouthing an Aggressive Behavior?

Most mouthing is normal dog behavior. Playful mouthing is usually less painful than more serious, aggressive biting. Dogs tend to spend a great deal of time playing, chewing, and investigating objects through their mouth. Young pups often chew on our fingers and toes of humans. This kind of behavior is natural in young pups but if it persists even when they’re older there might be some underlying problem.

The best thing you can do is try to curb their enthusiasm to chew or bite. Some dogs bite out of fear or frustration, and this type of biting can indicate problems with aggression. It’s sometimes difficult to tell the difference between normal play mouthing and mouthing that precedes aggressive behavior. A playful dog may have a relaxed body and face but its muzzle might look wrinkled.

The aggressive behavior in dogs generally starts with growling, stiff body, pulling their teeth out, and creating wrinkled muzzle. This is a tell-tale sign of your dog’s aggressive behavior.

Major causes for sudden aggressive behavior

i. Illness and Injury

Illness or injury is a common cause for dogs to become aggressive. They show signs of aggression such as growling, snapping, and biting.

The underlying medical condition or pain can make dogs often stressed and sensitive. They react to things quickly and most aggressively. Some possible causes of pain may include arthritis, bone fractures, internal injuries, various tumors, and lacerations. Injury to the head may also cause a sudden outbreak of aggression among pets.

ii. Fear

It’s natural for dogs to exhibit aggressive behavior if they sense they're in danger. When animals are afraid of something, they prefer to run away which is called the flight response. But if escaping isn’t an option, most animals will switch to a fight response. In the case of dogs, they will often growl, snap, and bite.

Fear aggression is characterized by rapid nips or bites because a fearful dog is motivated to bite and then run away. Male and female dogs are equally prone to fear aggression.

iii. Possessiveness

Possession aggression may occur when a dog becomes possessive about their food, toy, bed, or any other forms of possession. A dog exhibiting possession aggression will growl if someone approaches near. They inhibited the tendency to show possessive aggression from their prehistoric predecessors who had to compete for food, shelter, and mates to survive.

iv. Frustration

Aggression induced by frustration is often referred to as redirected aggression or barrier frustration. Over time, a dog can learn to associate restraint with feelings of frustration. This may explain why some dogs become aggressive when put behind a gate or inside a cage. They may exhibit aggression in the long run when they’re made to spend a lot of time tied up, restrained on a leash, or behind a chain-link fence.

v. Territorial Aggression

Like many other wild animals, dogs exhibit territorial aggression. This tendency can be linked to their wild relatives such as the wolf. Dogs sometimes show aggression to establish dominance. Territorial possession can induce dominance among pets. Territorial aggression can occur along the boundary regularly patrolled by a dog. Other dogs show territorial aggression only toward people or other animals coming into the home.

How to curb biting in dogs?

Here are some handy ways to curb biting in dogs.

Spay or neuter your dog

Spaying or neutering your dog can help to control their hormonal levels, resulting in more docile behavior.

Spaying a female dog will reduce or eliminate its drive to roam while in heat. It will also eliminate your dog's instinct to wander or fight with other dogs. In male dogs, neutering can help lower their testosterone level, hence making them less aggressive.

Don't let your dog wander or go off-leash

A pet dog is more likely to face wrath from street dogs when they're left unmonitored. Don’t let your dog roam outside freely. Keeping your dog contained lowers the chance of them encountering and fighting with other dogs. This will also prevent them from encountering wild animals like raccoons, porcupine, and hedgehogs.

Avoid stressful situations

If your dog has already shown aggressive behavior, you should avoid creating or putting them in a stressful situation. Watch your dog's behavior to learn signs of stress.

  • You should avoid taking them to packed or busy places. A large crowd can overwhelm dogs.
  • Don't introduce them to too many people.
  • Have a safe space for your dog to relax, walk, or play.

Provide obedience training

Training your dog for basic obedience and curbing aggression is a fruitful option. The obedience-training classes run by expert trainers and groomers can help your dog to

  • socialize with other animals and people
  • teach them to deal with fears and unwanted situations
  • teach dog owners to properly reward or punish their pets
  • Identify and curb situations that may make your dog stressed.

Teach dogs to be gentle with their teeth and mouth

Dogs mostly play and learn through their teeth and mouth. It's normal for young pups to nibble on toys, food items, other animals, and humans; however, you will want to start training them to never bite.

Wait for your pup is about to bite. Then, say "No" or "no bite" in a sharp voice. If it stops biting you, offer it a treat.

If your dog continues biting, you should take it to the nearest trainer.

Use a time-out method

If your dog doesn't respond to simple yipping and short refusal, try adopting a time-out procedure. Ignoring them can be a powerful way to tell them that their behavior is unacceptable.

When bitten, yelp loudly. Ignore them for ten to twenty seconds, or place them in space by themself for four to twenty seconds.

Reward your dog consistently for good behavior.

You should start praising your dog and reward them consistently for good behavior. The positive reinforcement will help them continue their good behavior.

  • You should only reward their behavior that you want to encourage.
  • Keep treats handy so that you can reward them easily.
  • Don't overfeed your dog with treats. It can lead to teeth problems or obesity.

Distinguish the different types of biting behavior

A dog may show different types of biting behavior. Most dogs love to nibble on stuff to examine or play with them. Young pups often nibble or playfully bite people. A sudden aggressive biting in older dogs is mostly caused by an underlying medical condition, hormonal changes, or encountering fearful and stressful situations.

Here is the detail information and Infographics on tips about how to make your dog stop biting.

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the best doggy daycare in Urbandale. Learn more about different ways to calm an aggressive dog or get in touch with us to start training your dogs for aggressive behaviors.

How do I potty train my dog in just 7 days?

It isn’t easy to get your new dog to relieve itself in a designated place. Anyone who has brought a new pup or an untrained dog home must know they have to spend countless hours training their pet to poo in a designed place.

Training your new dog to poo in a designed place isn’t always the first thing you should do. First, you should start with housebreaking your pup. As you begin, keep in mind that fully housebreaking your puppy can take four to six months of consistency and patience.

When to start potty training?

This is the most discussed question among the dog trainers, when do you start potty training? Many canine experts advice to start potty training is between 12 and 16 weeks old. By that age, the dog will have enough control over its bladder and bowel movement.
The dogs which are housebroken can easily adapt to potty training. Even after initial house training, most dogs still need a few weeks of practice to hold their bladder for a good amount of time.

How do I start potty training my dog?

The good news is that you can usually potty train your dog in just a week.

Size can be a predictor when it comes to potty training. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside. You Chihuahua is more likely to visit Powder Room than the big dogs like German Shepherd or Great Dane.

And while you're training, don’t worry if there are setbacks. Dogs may take time to adapt to a certain lifestyle. Don’t forget to reward them with a treat but just praise or pat after they’ve successfully relieved themselves in the designated spot.

The Seven Day Potty Training Schedule

  • Day of Training Goal
  • Day 1 Establish a consistent feeding schedule.
  • Day 2 Establish a consistent "potty break" schedule.
  • Day 3 Get your dog accustomed to relieving himself in the same location every time.
  • Day 4 Make sure you know the signs that your dog is about to go, and take him outside when appropriate.
  • Day 5 Less accidents inside the house should now be happening. When one happens, guide the dog outside to the potty spot.
  • Day 6 Check your dog's status.
  • Day 7 Reinforce weak areas.

Day 1
Start the day by establishing a regular feeding schedule that you'll be able to stick with. A consistent eating schedule will ensure that your dog relieves in a consistent routine. Be wary about your dog's dietary requirements. Pups compared to dogs need to be fed 3 or 4 times a day with enough water to help digest their meal.

Day 2
You'll basically continue with your first day's schedule. Strictly stick to the schedule and feed your dog on a regular basis. Take them to the loo the first thing in the morning as well as just before you go to bed at night.
Smaller dogs and young pups should be taken for loo after every hour or so during the day. Young pups relieve themselves up to five times a day.
Every time it does its business, you can offer it a treat and verbal praise to bolster its motivation.

Day 3
You should use this day to pinpoint an exact location where your dog should defecate and pee. Start taking them to the spot at all times when they must relieve themselves. This will be their "potty spot." After each routine, you can offer them a treat.

Day 4
On day four, you can start by noticing and working with potty signals. Work on spotting the signs that your dog is about to go. You must allow yourself time and patience to keep an eye on their behavior.
By learning this method, you can rush them outside to a specific location whenever they exhibit signals.

Day 5
By day five, your dog will somewhat get used to relieving on that specific spot. All you'll need to do is guide them outside. In the case of young pups, the occasional accidents could continue but let yourself down. Continue with the schedule.
When your pup accidentally relieves inside the house, you should punish it. Let them know this by clapping loudly then immediately take it outside to the potty spot. Each time it's able to relieve on the potty spot, reward it a treat.

Day 6
Day six is a status check day. By this time, your dog will make significant progress. The whole idea is to train your dog to visit the potty spot by itself or signal you to take it there whenever they need to relieve it.

Day 7
After a week of consistent potty training, your dog will get used to this schedule. Don't forget to punish them every time they accidentally defecate inside the house. It's important to instill good value in them.

You can start gradually slowing the treats, so they get used to their potty schedule without any rewards.

  • Few Basic Guidelines
  • In the case of a small pup, you can train them to wait for at least three before going to the loo. A two-month puppy can hold its bladder for three hours. You have to teach them to wait three hours. For bigger and older dogs, the time length span can be over 5-6 hours. 
  • Do remember, pups often need to go outside after waking up, eating, chewing their toys and playing, etc. 
  • Every month, you can start adding one hour to the puppy’s tolerance. This can go up to about eight hours a day. 
  • Eight hours is the maximum. Even the biggest adult dogs shouldn’t be expected to hold it for more than eight hours.
  • Don’t immediately start at the maximum time possible for your pup just because it can hold it for over three hours. Train them to a certain schedule gradually so they’re less likely to make mistakes.

Things to Remember

  • Be Direct - Always take your dog directly to the potty spot. Don't take your pup for a walk around or sniff around things. The commute should be direct from the house to the potty.
  • Offer treats - Always offers treat and rewards when they go outside. you can gradually lessen the treats when they get used to the potty schedule.
  • Don’t make potty the last part of the trip -Don’t end the trip outside as soon as they pee. This will teach them to hold it as long as possible
  • Be patient - Getting your dog to defecate or pee immediately can be a difficult affair. Instead, treat this as a boring time for yourself and your dog. No playtime after late-night potty breaks.
  • Go back inside immediately if they don't relieve - Take them inside to the house immediately if they don't defecate. Try again in the next 20-30 minutes.
  • Monitor your dog's access to water before bedtime to reduce late-night potty breaks.

Here is the brief infographics about for the advice on how to potty train your dog in just 7 days.

It isn’t easy to housebreak or potty train your dog. You’d need to be prepared mentally to effectively potty train your dog. Get in touch with Urban Pet Hospital & Resort, the best doggy daycare in Urbandale., for training your dogs and the best doggy daycare service.

 

 

 

Facts about dog rehoming and adoption

Adopting a dog is often the best and the kindest thing you can do. Over 6.5 million companion animals enter U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year. Over half of these animals never find a home and are euthanized.

According to the animal shelter statistics, in 2017 around 1.5 million animals in shelters were euthanized. 670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats made up this staggering number, which amounted to almost 5,500 animals killed every day

What is Rehoming and how much does it?

Hundreds of thousands of pets are abandoned every year. When you can no longer care for a pet for any reason, rehoming can a good idea. Instead of abandoning your pet or sending them to an animal shelter where it may be killed, you can find him a new home for your pet. 

There are many reasons why a pet owner abandons a pet. More common ones include: Moving, can’t keep; landlord won’t allow; not enough time; and can’t afford.

You can prevent this by taking the time to find the right home for your dog. The process involves paying a certain rehoming fee. Don't worry, this is to help facilitate the rehoming process goes smoothly.

When rehoming a pet to someone you don’t know, it is common to charge a rehoming fee. On average, this can range from $25 to $100. A rehoming fee can help you cover charges for vaccinations, spaying, and neutering, and other expenses. 

You can help save these animals by finding them a comfortable home. Animal shelters around the country offer easy adoption and rehoming facility. It’s often cheaper to adopt a dog instead of buying a new dog. The cost for adoption usually accounts for a mere adoption fee, medical, ID tagging, vaccines, pet accessories

Why consider rehoming your dog?

Here are two major reasons for you to consider rehoming your dog.

To avoid dog squabbles at home

If you have two or more dogs at home, it's common to find them squabbling. When you introduce a new pet to your old, they can often become aggressive towards them. Frequent squabbles and rough play can put one or more dogs at risk of serious injury.

If the management of behavior isn't possible, it's fair to move your dog to a new home instead of abandoning them. Rehoming your dog will help it find another family.

The dog is a danger to someone in the household

Most dogs with behavioral issues are often abandoned by pet owners. To avoid dog bites or aggression towards other pets and humans, you can consider rehoming your pet. 

Change in circumstances

The circumstances in your life are unpredictable. You might land up a new job out of the state and must move or fly out of the country, or take up an apartment where the dogs aren't allowed. All of these circumstances may push you to make a rather harsh decision to abandon them. You can avoid this by rehoming your pet.

Wrong dog for the situation

Most new pet owners acquire a dog for a specific purpose such as assistance for the disabled, to assist people with medical conditions, for sporting activities or competition, etc. Once the purpose of dogs in your life is complete, you might decide to put it up for adoption or abandon it. The best possible thing you can do find a new home so the new owners can enjoy both the company and the skill of your pet.

Here are a few of the steps to find a new dog

It's rather simple to find and adopt a dog these days. Many animal shelters put up advertisement or listing in online directories for new pet owners to find a potential pet.

Step 1: Find a dog or puppy online

The organizations like ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in the UK) allow pet owners to find an adoptable dog of their choice.
They put up a list of dogs who are often abandoned or are put up for rehoming

Step 2: Complete a rehoming application form

The next step is to fill out an application form indicating that you're willing to adopt a new dog. After accepting your application, the organization or local animal shelter will arrange a visit.

Step 3: Get to know your new dog

When all the parties agree, you can visit the pet owners home or an animal shelter to meet the new dog. You can discuss all the details related to the dog, lifestyle, diet, medical condition, etc.

Step 4: Home visit

The officials from the animal shelter often visit your home to inspect the new facility. They'll also advise you on how to proceed further from here. 

Step 5: Bring home your new dog

Once everything is done, you can welcome the new dog home. Remember to introduce your new pet to your family member and any existing pets. If you must introduce your new dog to your old pet, be wary about the aggression and temperament of your old dog. Before you can get it home, you must spay or neuter it, vaccinate it, microchip it with an ID, and pay a rehoming or adoption fee.

How to introduce your dogs to dogs?

  • Solve your old dog's behavioral issues first
  • Decide on a meeting place
  • On-leash and off-leash meeting
  • Don't leave them alone
  • Break any fight or squabble
  • Separate their toys'
  • Dine them separately
  • Clearly establish your dominance
  • Train them separately

Things to keep in mind

  • Be wary of rehoming your pet through classified sites. Many people troll such sites looking for dogs to use for wrong purposes.
  • Charging a rehoming fee allows you the new adopter to demonstrate that they're serious about adopting your pet. Also, charging a rehoming fee will enable you to know that they've financial resources in hand.
  • Contact your local animal shelter, ASPCA, or adoptapet.com to successfully rehome your pet.

Here is a brief infographics about the facts about dog rehoming and adoption.

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the most reliable pet hospital in Urbandale. We also offer the best doggy daycare in Urbandale to help board, groom and train you canine. Leave them in the care of our certified veterinarian and daycare trainers. We also help rescue abandoned pets and find them a good home.