September is Responsible Dog Ownership Month

September is marked as the Responsible Dog Ownership month by the American Kennel Club. This day is celebrated to bring the importance of responsible dog ownership into the light. As a pet owner, you are responsible for your dog’s behavior in public or private, hence, you must take the responsibility of training your pet under consideration when you own a new pet.

There are many pet training centers, veterinarians and videos on Youtube which can help you properly train your dog, so you mustn’t face the embarrassment from the nuisance created by your beloved pet.

Dog Ownership Commitments

  • You must train your dog for basic commands; Sit, Stand up, Come, Drop it (Unnecessary or harmful stuff in its mouth), and Down
  • Keep your dog leashed in public
  • Clean up their poo
  • Keep your dog fit with regular walks and exercise
  • Make sure you’ve trained your dog to not bark unnecessarily
  • Take them to vet regularly

As a pet owner, you can

Evaluate your lifestyle –Assess if you can own a pet mentally and economically.

Choose the right breed –This is the most essential point, as many pet owners choose the breed that is wrong for them.

Choose the age of dog –Not everyone can adopt a puppy. Assess if you can pet a older dog better.

Adopt a Dog – Millions of dogs land up in shelter every year. You can do a great deed by adopting one.

Register your dog –Consider registering your dog with American Kennel Club. Registering comes with great advantages for both the dog and an owner

Train your dog –To enjoy stress free ownership, you must train your dog properly and also save yourself from the embarrassment

Groom your dog –Consider grooming your dog regularly. A dog can suffer greatly both mentally and physically if they aren’t properly groomed.

Keep clinic visits, vaccination and nutrition on check –A healthy dog can survive longer and with sound health.

Offer a better home –The environment of your home determines the overall health, manner and longevity of your pet. A proper dog house, nutritious meals, daily exercises and socialization with other humans can be of great help.


To learn more about responsible dog ownership, check pet training information.

How to Perform CPR on Dogs?

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation or CPR is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, especially when your dog’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped. Heart attack, near drowning or electric shock are few of the occasions when a dog may require CPR. Unlike humans, the resuscitation is done only through the nose but mouth, and the CPR is only performed on unconscious animal to avoid the risk of being beaten.

CPR alone is unlikely to revive the heart. Its main purpose is to restore partial flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart. Its objective is to delay tissue death and to extend the brief window of opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage.


Common CPR technique for dogs

Check for breathing and a heartbeat

Confirm if your pet is breathing or check their heartbeat. If they aren’t breathing or there is no sign of heartbeat, then immediately begin CPR with chest compression.

Give chest compression

CPR for Dogs below 30 Pounds (14 kg)

For cats, small dogs and deep chested dogs, place the heel of one of your hands directly over the pet’s heart and place your other hand directly over the first hand.

Compress the chest for one inch to one-quarter or one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 100 compressions in a minute.

CPR for Dogs above 30 Pounds (14 kg)

Without bending both the elbows, press the rib cage in a downward motion.

Compress the chest for one-quarter to one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 80 compressions per minute.

Make sure the chest comes back fully (recoils) before compressing again.

Give resuscitation

To provide resuscitation, gently close the dog’s mouth and extend the neck to open the airway. Cover their nose with your mouth and exhale until you see their chest rising. Give a second rescue breath.

Continue CPR

Continue giving CPR with a cycle of 30 chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths until your dog begins breathing again on its own.

Check again for breathing and a heartbeat

Briefly check for breathing and a heartbeat every 2 minutes.

If your dog doesn’t show any sign of improvement after 10 minutes, you can stop the procedure as it hasn’t proven successful.