12 Dog Diseases You Can Combat with Vaccination

Canine vaccination is as important as human vaccinations. It not only helps to keep the serious disease on the bay but also protects your dog’s immune system. Each state in the US has its own law regarding canine vaccination with the exception of Rabies. The vaccination for rabies is mandatory in all states. You can be sure that like Rabies, you can prevent other serious diseases by administering vaccination to your dogs.

Why Canine Vaccination is Important?

Vaccines contain antigens that mimic disease-causing organisms in a dog’s immune system. It prepares a dog's immune system to defend itself from any invasion of the disease-causing organisms. The antigen mildly stimulates the immune system of the dog by having it recognize its presence.
The American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Task Force considers the following dog vaccinations to be core:

  • Canine Parvovirus
  • Canine Distemper
  • Hepatitis
  • Rabies

The non-core canine vaccines, but still important, include

  • Bordetella
  • Canine Influenza (dog flu)
  • Leptospirosis
  • Lyme vaccine

12 Dog Diseases that can be prevented with Vaccine
Here is the list of 12 dangerous canine diseases that can be prevented by timely vaccination.

Rabies (Zoonotic in nature)

Rabies is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain. It’s primarily passed to dogs through a bite from an infected dog or wild animals such as bats, raccoons, skunks, foxes, etc. It can easily transmit through a scratch or when infected saliva makes contact with mucous membranes or an open, fresh wound.

Rabies is commonly treated by Nobivac®- Canine 1-DAPPv vaccine, a modified live virus vaccine for the vaccination of healthy dogs as an aid in the prevention of disease caused by canine distemper virus, adenovirus type 1 (hepatitis), and adenovirus type 2 (respiratory disease), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine parvovirus.

The only remedy for rabies is the proper vaccination. Dogs should be vaccinated between 3 and 6 months of age. They need a booster one year from that date. They’re generally vaccinated every three years.

Canine parvovirus infection ("parvo")

Parvo is a highly contagious virus that causes an infectious gastrointestinal (GI) illness in puppies and young dogs. The deadly virus spreads either by direct contact with an infected dog or through feces. The Parvovirus can survive at room temperature for months hence it can easily transmit to dogs. Check for telltale signs such as bloody diarrhea, lethargy, anorexia, fever, vomiting, etc. in dogs.

Vaccines for the parvovirus are recommended for all puppies and are usually given in a series of three shots when the pup is between 6-to-8 weeks old, again at 10-to-12 weeks, and at 14-to-16 weeks. Like rabies, a booster shot is administered one year later and every 3 years after that.

Vaccines for the parvovirus are recommended for all puppies and are usually given in a series of three shots when the pup is between 6-to-8 weeks old, again at 10-to-12 weeks, and at 14-to-16 weeks. Like rabies, a booster shot is administered one year later and every 3 years after that.

Canine distemper

Canine distemper is a viral disease caused by a virus that attacks the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems of dogs. It not only affects dogs but also wild animals. It’s a contagious and serious disease that can easily transmit from wild animals to dogs.


Puppies and dogs most often become infected through airborne exposure (through sneezing or coughing) to the virus from an infected dog or wild animal. Infected dogs often develop watery to pus-like discharge from their eyes followed by a fever, nasal discharge, coughing, lethargy, reduced appetite, and vomiting.


You should administer a distemper shot to puppies at six to eight weeks of age. All dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.

Leptospirosis (Zoonotic in nature)

Leptospirosis is caused by spiral-shaped bacteria called leptospires that live in water or warm, wet soil. Initial signs of leptospirosis in dogs include fever, lethargy, and lack of appetite. Experts say that any dog that regularly goes outside the home is potentially at risk of contracting this disease.

It takes about 4-12 days for the bacteria to incubate. The four-serovar vaccine is currently the only vaccine recommended by experts for Leptospirosis. Revaccinating annually is often needed to maintain the best immunity.

Canine adenovirus-2

Canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) is related to the hepatitis virus, canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1). It leads to recessive or mild respiratory tract infections and may cause infectious laryngotracheitis and symptoms of pneumonia. It’s also one of the causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as canine cough.

The joint vaccine is a core vaccine that contains live attenuated canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus (CAV-2), canine parvovirus (C154), and canine parainfluenza virus. A joint vaccine is commonly administered to dogs to prevent CAV-2 infection.

Canine parainfluenza

Canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) is a highly contagious respiratory virus common in dogs. It may develop in situations where large groups of dogs are close together for a period of time. CPIV is also one of the most common pathogens of infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as canine cough. It shouldn’t be mistaken with kennel cough. Although the respiratory signs may resemble those of canine influenza and CAV-2, they are unrelated viruses and require different vaccines for protection.

Canine enteric coronavirus

Canine coronavirus (CCoV) is an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus which is a member of the species Alphacoronavirus 1. Most dogs with canine coronavirus are contracted by oral contact with infected fecal matter. A dog may also become infected by eating from contaminated food bowls or by direct contact with an infected dog.

Be wary, canine coronavirus (CCoV) is not the same virus as SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19. Hence, the vaccine for CCoV should be used for treating COVID-19. The vaccine for CCoV is readily available but it’s not recommended for all dogs and will be administered based on your dog's lifestyle and risk assessment.

Canine influenza

Canine influenza or Dog Flu is influenza occurring in dogs that are caused by varieties of influenza virus A, such as equine influenza virus (H3N8). The Dog flu is airborne; respiratory secretions escape into the environment in the form of coughing, barking, and sneezing, where they are then inhaled by a new canine host. 

The vaccine for Canine influenza is easily available. This vaccine must be given twice initially with a two-week break, then annually thereafter.

Lyme disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection (Lyme borreliosis) caused by the bite of flea and tick. The ticks that carry Lyme disease are especially likely to be found in tall grasses, thick brush, marshes, and woods. They easily jump into your dog’s coat.

The most common signs of Lyme disease include fever, loss of appetite, painful or swollen joints. The treatment includes antibiotics, usually for at least 30 days. As a preventive measure, you can check for flea and tick collar, vet-approved flea and tick preventive, and a vaccine.

Bordetellosis ("kennel cough")

Bordetella is the most common cause of kennel cough. Bordetella bronchiseptica is a bacterium that is associated with respiratory disease that causes inflammation of the trachea and bronchi.

The symptoms include a hacking cough, retching, sneezing, watery nasal discharge, pneumonia, inappetence, fever, etc.

Adult dogs that come into contact with large groups of other dogs should have a Bordetella vaccine annually.

Heartworm disease

Known as Dirofilaria immitis, the heartworm or dog heartworm is a parasitic roundworm that looks like a small thread-like creature. It spreads from the bite of an infected mosquito.

The symptoms include soft and dry cough, lethargy, weight loss, anorexia, difficulty in breathing, etc. 

It can be prevented with monthly chewable tablets; Ivermectin (sold under the brand names Heartgard, Iverhart, and several other generic versions), Milbemycin (Interceptor Flavor Tabs and Sentinel Flavor Tabs), and Moxidectin (ProHeart) administered as pills or chewable tablets.

Intestinal worms (roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms, etc., some of which can also infect people)

The intestinal worm is common in dogs. There are various kinds of worms contracted by dogs over their lifetime. They mostly contract it from their mother in the womb, by ingesting contaminated soil (soil with feces), eating another infected animal, and fleas.

We have a detail information on infographics as well:


You can easily get your dog screened for worm infections and find proper treatments. Flea preventive measure is often used as a vaccine to prevent intestinal worm.

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is the best pet hospital in Des Moines. Our certified veterinarian can help you with all the questions regarding canine vaccines and preventive measures for healthy dog life.

Can Dogs Get The COVID-19?

Although there are thousands of cases of COVID-19 infection among humans, there have been fewer or none cases in pets such as dogs and cats. Simply put, your pets are less likely to contract COVID-19, however, they are prone to different types of coronaviruses, but that has nothing to do with the current outbreak of COVID-19.

Coronavirus disease 2019 or popularly known as COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS coronavirus 2 or SARS-CoV-2).

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, no animals in the US have been identified with the virus, and there is no evidence that dogs or other pets can spread COVID-19.

How worried should a pet owner when the pet gets infected?

Dr. Andrew Pickerstein from Stamford, Connecticut clarified that,

“Dogs do not get this novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Although a couple of dogs in Asia did test positive on a surface swab, they weren’t actually infected with it.”

There aren’t any concrete cases of COVID-19 infection in pets; hence, until there is any information, the experts suggest that the pet owners can feel confident that the virus won’t spread between pets. However, there is a greater likelihood of certain bacteria on animals spreading between owners and their pets, so diligent hand washing is recommended.

What about the dog in Hong Kong?

The news of a Pomeranian contacting COVID-19 hit the news on February 28. This sent a caution to the pet owners around the world. Hong Kong health authorities announced that a dog belonging to a woman sick with COVID-19 also tested “weakly positive” for the new coronavirus, the virus that causes the disease.

Experts called it a “low-level infection” –suggesting it was surface contamination, with the dog picking up traces of the virus in its nose and mouth rather. Although this was likely to be the first reported case of human-to-animal transmission of the disease, the experts nullified any chances of serious illness in the dog.

What does that test result mean for the pet owners and family members?

Although pets are prone to other types of coronaviruses, pet owners can be relieved that their pets are safe from the novel coronavirus.

Previous experience with SARS suggests that cats and dogs will not become sick or transmit the virus to humans.

Experts from the University of Hong Kong, City University and the World Organization for Animal Health had been consulted, and all “unanimously agreed that these results suggest that the dog has a low level of infection and it is likely to be a case of human-to-animal transmission.”

Pet owners should practice caution whenever around an animal such as regularly washing hands before and after petting the dog, covering mouth with a tissue or a mask, and distancing oneself from the pet if there are any signs of infection.

How Pet owners keep their animals and family’s safe?

The preventive measures for COVID-19 are as follows:

a. Wash your hands frequently

To keep yourself and your pets from contracting COVID-19 or any other form of Coronavirus, you should thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Washing your hand prevents easy transmission of the infection.

b. Maintain Distance

If you have any symptoms such as coughing or sneezing, maintain at least 1 meter (3 feet) distance between yourself and your dog. Sneezing or coughing often sprays small liquid droplets that may contain the virus.

c. Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth

To ensure the safety of your family and pets, do not fidget with your eyes, nose, and mouth before or after petting your dog. Most infections occur when a person incessantly touches their nose, mouth, and eyes.

d. Practice respiratory hygiene

Make sure to cover your mouth or nose when sneezing or coughing. Use disposable tissue and mask whenever around your pets

e. Seek medical care early

Stay home or indoors if you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. It’s essential to quarantine yourself and keep your pets away from you.

f. Stay informed

Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow the advice given by your healthcare provider, your national and local public health authority or your employer on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

 

What about the reports that an animal was the source of the virus?

A research team investigating about COVID-19 outbreak said COVID-19 may originate in bats. The genome sequencing of the novel coronavirus is as high as 96 percent identical with a type of coronavirus from bats, the team said, adding that the new coronavirus enters the receptor using the same cells with SARS virus.

Many experts suggested that the COVID-19 originated in the Wuhan’s Seafood market in China. Analysis of genomic data from 93 samples of the novel coronavirus suggests it was imported from elsewhere and the Chinese seafood market boosted its circulation and spread.

What should I do if my animal came in contact with someone who is later diagnosed with COVID -19?

Animals spread viruses between one another that are genetically distinct from human viruses. The genetic distinction makes it extremely difficult for humans and their pets to pass diseases on to one another including COVID-19.

There isn’t evidence that COVID-19 can spread through pets, so don’t worry. If your pet gets sick after interaction with someone with COVID-19, first call your veterinarian.

What if I or someone in my family develops COVID-19 or I am placed in quarantine because of close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19? What should I do about caring for my pet?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend limiting contact with pets or other animals if you develop COVID-19. In such a case, you should appoint someone else in the household to care for your pet if you are sick.

If you are in quarantine, but not sick, technically, your pet is in quarantine also, and you should find some way to care for the animal in the confines of your home, says veterinarian McKenzie.

Animal Rescue Foundation in Walnut Creek and the East Bay SPCA recommend that

  • Take precautions similar to common flu prevention.
  • Seek out reliable sources for updated information. The Centers for Disease Control, www.cdc.gov; World Health Organization, www.who.int; and World Small Animal Veterinary Association, www.wsava.org, are good places to go for information on the virus.
  • If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, the CDC recommends you minimize contact with your animal companions. Identify a family member or friend who can care for your pet.
  • Have crates, food, and extra supplies, including medications, on hand for quick movement of the pet. Two weeks’ worth of food, medicine, and other supplies is recommended. A pet first-aid kit is also good to have for any unplanned situation.
  • Ensure your animal’s vaccines are up-to-date in case boarding becomes necessary.
  • Document all medications with dosages and administering directions, including prescriptions from your veterinarian if a refill becomes necessary.
  • Pets should have identification such as an ID tag on their collar and a microchip. But remember, a microchip is only as good as the contact information registered to it.
  • Follow CDC and WHO guidelines: Wash your hands with soap and water for the time it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice; avoid touching your face; stay home if you are sick; cough or sneeze into your elbow; wash your hands before and after handling pets.
  • Pets don’t need masks.
  • If your companion animal has been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19, contact the public health worker involved with the patient’s care. They will contact state veterinarians and direct you from there. If you are told to bring your pet to your veterinarian, call first so they can prepare isolation areas.

How the pet Hospital Helps fight Rabies?

Rabies is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain in humans and other mammals. It is transmitted from infected animals to humans through bite or saliva. Rabies vaccination is the best way to avoid rabies infection in the future. Early symptoms can include fever and tingling at the site of exposure.

More than 55,000 people in poor countries die from rabies every year – a rate of one person every ten minutes. Africa and India still bear the highest burden of total annual rabies deaths.

How does the pet hospital help fight rabies?

The cases of rabies are commonly seen in Asia, Central Asia, Middle East, Africa, and Caribbean Countries. These cases are mostly reported from the bites of rabid dogs, and wild animals such as bats and monkeys.

The animals infected with rabies secrete large amounts of virus in their saliva; the disease is primarily passed to dogs through a bite from an infected animal. It can easily transmit through a scratch or when infected saliva makes contact with mucous membranes or an open, fresh wound.

rabies worldwide map

Human deaths from rabies; B: Death rates per capita (per 100 000 population); countries shaded in grey are free from canine rabies (TRS 3rd report, 2017)

Canines tend to suffer more from rabies than humans, as they are exposed to wild animals. The most common carriers of the rabies virus in this country are bats, raccoons, skunks, and foxes.

In the United States, rabies is reported in cats more than in any domestic species. If there are also cats in your household, it’s important to make sure they are vaccinated and kept indoors.

Pet Hospitals and veterinaries in the U.S. are committed to eradicating rabies. They have initiated and supported programs to help supply rabies vaccinations to areas at most risk for disease. Today, there are only fewer cases of rabies in dogs throughout the U.S.

The commonly used drug for treating rabies is Nobivac®, Canine 1-DAPPv vaccine is a modified live virus vaccine for the vaccination of healthy dogs as an aid in the prevention of disease caused by canine distemper virus, adenovirus type 1 (hepatitis) and adenovirus type 2 (respiratory disease), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine parvovirus.

dog saliva rabies

According to MERCK Animal Health,

“It is an effective 1-year vaccine to prevent rabies in dogs, cats, and ferrets. It is approved for the vaccination of healthy dogs, cats, and ferrets as an aid in preventing rabies. It is recommended for use in healthy dogs, cats and ferrets 3 months of age or older.”

Do rabies shots prevent dogs from getting rabies?

The only remedy for rabies is the proper vaccination. Dogs and cats are first vaccinated for rabies between 3 and 6 months of age. They need a booster one year from that date. They are then generally vaccinated every three years.

Some states still require annual rabies vaccinations for dogs and/or cats. So far, regular vaccination is the only method to effectively protect canines from getting rabies. However, you should still bring your dog to a veterinarian if you suspect it was bitten by a rabid dog or a wild animal. The veterinarian will recommend a booster vaccine and monitor the vital sign of your dog for any sign of infection.

It is false that the animals will clearly appear rabid and unwell if infected with the rabies virus. While most animals demonstrate some signs of illness such as aggression or lack of balance, some may not have noticeable symptoms.

Rabies the Disease vs. Rabies the Vaccine

It is the only vaccination required by law in the United States to curb rabies. The other main concern is that it is a zoonotic disease.

Zoonotic disease or zoonoses are terms used to describe an infection or disease that can be transmitted from an animal to a human being. In general, these diseases normally exist in animals but can affect humans through different forms of contact.

The zoonotic disease can be caused by a range of pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Of 1,415 pathogens known to infect humans, 61% are zoonotic in nature.

There is no possible cure for rabies; however, vaccinating your pet will help an animal mount an immune system response to protect against rabies.

How Long Do Vaccines Offer Protection?

Some experts suggest that a single shot of vaccine is enough for three years, however, many states in the U.S. demand that the owner take their pet for a vaccine shot every year.

How long a vaccine, rabies or otherwise, is "good" for, in terms of actual disease protection is still debated. The vaccine, the health of the individual and their immune system, the disease agents, all of these factors come into play.

zoonotic disease infographic

Do veterinarians need a rabies vaccine?

Veterinarians are at the front line when it comes to dealing with rabid dogs, infections, and treating other zoonotic diseases, hence they must be prepared beforehand to prevent any occupational hazard.

The rabies vaccine is equally effective in veterinarians to ward off chances of getting rabies.

Pre-exposure Rabies Vaccine

Pre-exposure rabies vaccination is provided as a precautionary measure. It provides additional protection for at-risk veterinarians, vet techs and other staff. Although it helps to ward off rabies, it but does not replace good preventive measures such as personal protective equipment, and safe animal and specimen handling procedures.

According to the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians’ Compendium of Veterinary Standard Precautions for Zoonotic Disease Prevention in Veterinary Personnel, all veterinary staff with animal contact must be vaccinated against rabies, followed by periodic titer checks and rabies vaccine boosters, in accordance with the ACIP recommendations.

The ACIP recommends titers on a schedule of every two years to assess protective immunity, with a single-injection booster vaccination recommended if the titer level is below 1:5 serum dilution (0.1-0.2 IU/mL).

rabid dog

Urban Pet Hospital & Resort is a premier veterinary in Des Moines specializing in pet care, pet health, and training. We have conducted and participated in community programs to rescue homeless pets. We carefully follow the state guideline regarding rabies vaccination. Our staffs are well-equipped to demonstrate rabies prevention.

Zoonotic Diseases Facts [Infographic]

Did You Know? Urban slums have the highest cases of zoonotic infection. Most of the zoonotic diseases are caused by pet animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, and horses.

Scientists in the US estimate that more than 6 out of every 10 known infectious diseases in humans are spread from animals, and 3 out of every 4 new or emerging infectious diseases in humans spread from animals.


What is Zoonotic Disease?

Zoonotic disease or zoonoses are terms used to describe an infection or disease that can be transmitted from an animal to a human being. In general, these diseases normally exist in animals but can affect humans through different forms of contact.

The zoonotic disease can be caused by a range of pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Of 1,415 pathogens known to infect humans, 61% are zoonotic in nature.

zoonotic historical image

How is the Zoonotic Disease Transmitted to humans?

Zoonotic diseases can be transmitted from animals to humans through four major channels.

i. Direct contact

In the direct zoonosis, the disease is directly transmitted from animals to humans through media such as air (influenza) or through bites and saliva (rabies). Zoonosis can also occur from contact with blood, urine, mucus, feces, or other body fluids of an infected animal. Petting or touching an animal, and scratches can also account for zoonosis through direct contact.

ii. Indirect contact

In Indirect contact, the zoonosis takes place through a secondary medium with any direct contact with the infected animals. This can occur at places or areas where animals live and roam, or objects or surfaces that they were in contact with. Indirect contact can occur from pet habitats, animal shelter, and contaminated pet food or utensils.

iii. Vector-borne

Vector-borne diseases are transmitted by vectors such as mosquitos, fleas, and ticks. The vectors become a host for infection after they have bitten the infected animals. Then they are carried to human beings through the bite.

iv. Foodborne

Consuming contaminated food is another major concern for zoonotic disease. Although foodborne diseases are more common in third world countries, every year one in six Americans gets sick from eating contaminated food. Unpasteurized milk, undercooked meat or eggs, or raw fruits and stale vegetables can cause foodborne zoonotic diseases.


Who is more prone to Zoonotic Diseases?

Some people are more at risk of zoonotic diseases than others. The fitness, age, and medical condition of a person may determine the chances of transmitting zoonotic disease.

These groups of people include:

  • Children younger than 5
  • Adults older than 65
  • People with weakened immune systems

The risk may be slightly higher in people with a compromised immune system from disease or medication which includes;

  • people with AIDS/HIV.
  • people on chemotherapy or receiving radiation therapy.
  • people who are elderly or have chronic diseases.
  • people with congenital immune deficiencies.
  • people who have received organ or bone marrow transplants.
  • pregnant women (the fetal immune system is not fully developed, and the pregnant woman's immune system is altered during pregnancy).

People who fall into these categories must be extra careful when they are around animals. Take basic precautions such as washing hands after petting or touching the animal, and avoiding secondary contacts such as staying away from contaminated food or pet shelters.

What Zoonotic Diseases does a Dog Carry?

Most of the zoonotic diseases in humans are transmitted from pet animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, and horses.

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), these are the most common zoonotic diseases found in the US. These can be prevented by implementing the best doggy daycare in Des Moines.

a. Ringworm

The symptoms of ringworm in dogs include dandruff-like scaling in the depths of the coat, red lesions on the head, chest, forelegs and the ridge of the back.

b. Salmonellosis

Salmonellosis is a symptomatic infection caused by bacteria of the Salmonella type. It usually results in symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea in dogs.

c. Rabies

Rabies is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain in humans and animals. It is transmitted from infected animals to humans through bite or saliva. Rabies vaccination is the best way to avoid rabies infection in the future.

d. Leptospirosis

A leptospirosis is a common form of infection in dogs that is caused by corkscrew-shaped bacteria called Leptospira. Signs of leptospirosis include fever, lethargy, and lack of appetite.

e. Lyme disease

Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is an infectious disease caused by the Borrelia bacterium which is spread by ticks. Lyme disease can cause kidney failure and death in severe cases.

f. Campylobacter infection

PetMD reports that up to 49 percent of dogs carry campylobacteriosis, shedding it into their feces for other animals to contract. Humans can easily contract the disease if they fail to practice proper hygiene after coming into contact with an infected animal. The signs of Campylobacter infection in dogs include watery to mucoid diarrhea, abdominal cramping or pain, lethargy, and fever.

g. Roundworms

Roundworms can infest the dog digestive tract. The signs of roundworm in dogs include colic, lethargy, vomiting, abdominal swelling, abnormal feces, etc. Coming in contact with contaminated soil or infected dog feces can result in human ingestion and infection.

h. Scabies

Sarcoptic mange or Scabies in dogs is caused by the Sarcoptes scabies mite, a highly contagious skin parasite. The mites burrow into their skin and cause severe itching that can result in the formation of scabs and hair loss.

zoonotic diseases facts

Prevention from Zoonotic Diseases

Zoonotic diseases are reported to be one of the most common diseases contracted by humans worldwide. To prevent zoonotic diseases, you should adopt the following measures.

PERSONAL HYGIENE

  • Wash hands before and after handling or petting animals.
  • Avoid eating or drinking anything close to the pet’s shelter.
  • Wear preventive overalls when handling farm animals.
  • Avoid handling sick animals or animals with lesions without wearing any gloves and masks.
  • Always wear a mask while entering pet shelters such as dog kennel and animal farms.
  • DO NOT enter the agricultural animal facilities when you are sick!
  • Use preventive gear while cleaning any animal area.
  • If you notice any sign of illness, contact your medical personnel ASAP.

ENVIRONMENTAL MAINTENANCE

  • Keep animal shelters such as kennel and cattle farm organized and regularly cleaned.
  • It’s important to clean any urine and fecal build-up. Dry feces result in fecal dust which may be inhaled. Most bacteria reside inside the fecal build-up.
  • Clean rooms have a lower likelihood of horizontal or zoonotic transfer.
  • Build animal housing areas away from the house or in an isolated area unless you’re building a dog kennel.
  • Quarantine the animal’s housing area with the help of experts when you notice the sign of any major infection or diseases.

HERD/FLOCK MAINTENANCE

This is more applicable if you own or handle a large number of animals such as cattle flock.

  • Observe animals for health status on a daily basis.
  • Report sick or dead animals.
  • Note health problems such as diarrhea, difficulty breathing, depressed, immobile.
  • Take extra caution in cleaning the areas around ill animals. Don’t spread possible pathogens.
  • Isolate affected animals as appropriate.
  • Record history or progression of animal disease.

Preventive Takeaways from Urban Pet Hospital and Resort

Urban Pet Hospital and Resort is a premier Doggy daycare in Urbandale that ensures the prevention of any infection or disease caused by animals. Here are four preventive takeaways that you should always keep in mind.

  1. Properly wash fruits and vegetables before consuming them.
  2. Prevent contamination of water sources.
  3. Undertake pet vaccinations.
  4. Avoid contact with wild animals.